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Full text of "Pegasus Yearbook 1992"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

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In a yearbook, it is our mission to depict a year of events at this institution. 
Tlie Pegasus traditionally fills its pages with pictures of campus social 
events, clubs and sports. |bI This year the Pegasus took a closer look to 
see what and who the college was all about in 1991-1992. The emphasis this 

The summer of 1991 brought sorrow to the Washington College 

campus when the vibrant elm fell victim to Dutch Elm Disease. 

For sixty-three years, it was the living symbol of the college, 

and the place of traditional ceremonies. In this edition of the 

Pegasus, we would like to display the final pictures of the elm, 

remembering it always as the enormous, beautiful tree that 

stood in the center of campus. 

year has been on the growing diversity of the student body and the activities 
in which they participate, sm Although the Pegasus may not reflect every 
Washington College student, we can use the yearbook as an instrument that 
magnifies the changes here. 1^ When we look through this yearbook, we 
observe the parts of the community in which each of us has been involved, 
and understand in our own personal way. You may not find specifics that 
recall your own experiences, but the yearbook may serve as a catalyst to 
bring you closer to your own world at Washington College. 





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PEGASUS 

Vol. LXVI 

Washington College 
estertown, Maryland 
21620 



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CONTENTS 





TUDENT LIFE 
ACULTY 




ENIORS 





CTIVITIES 
PORTS 



18 



70 



84 



152 



170 




18 STUDENT LIFE 



9M TUDENT 



STUDENT LIFE 19 





ashington Col- 
lege students 
come from a va- 
riety of places. Half of our 
850 students come from 
Maryland, the rest come pri- 
marily from other Middle 
Atlantic states and the 
Northeast, with some stu- 
dents from other parts of the 
US and foreign countries. 
Approximately 30 states and 
15 foreign countries are rep- 
resented in the student en- 
rollment. 

WC is host to a number 
of clubs and activities that 
will cater to the diverse so- 
cial and cultural interests of 
its student body. Those stu- 
dents with a love for music 
or drama may find them- 
selves involved in a senior 
production or the annual 
Renaissance Dinner/Dance. 



Those with an interest in stu- 
dent government can pursue 
it by involving themselves in 
the SGA. In addition, a 
number of clubs have re- 
cently been founded on the 
basis of student interest; 
these include The Dale Ad- 
ams Heritage Exchange, 
Hillel, The Society of Junior 
Fellows, and The Outdoor 
Skills Club, to name a few. 
Independent study, work 
study, the 3:2 engineering 
program and ODK are 
among the many academic 
options. 

Aside from academics and 
hobbies, WC students can be 
found working out, studying, 
doing laundry, partying, 
shopping, snoozing, or just 
hanging out on the front 
lawn on a beautiful spring 
day. 



4 EXPERIENCE THE WAc4 




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POPULAR CLASSES 



En Garde! 



g 



ome classes we take be- 
cause we have to. Oth- 
ers we take, however, 



just for the fun of it. Penny 
Fall's fencing class not only 
improves your coordination. 



but it also provides a fun meth 
od of stress-relief in betweei 
academic classes. You also ge 
to wear a neat outfit! Tex An 
drews' beginning drawing clas: 
is a relaxing way for student 
to spend their afternoons. Jin 
Siemen's impersonations of thi 
psychologically disturbed, cou 
pled with participation in sen 
ior experimentation, makt 
Psych 201 an unforgettable ex 
perience. 






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A CENTENARY OF COEDUCATION 



WE'VE COME A LONG WAY, 

BABY! 




Ine hundred years ago, when 
"coeducation" was still a 
little-used word, Washing- 
ton College became one of the first 
private colleges in the United States 
to educate women "on an equal 
standing with the men." This past 
year, the Washington College com- 
munity celebrated its centenary of 
coeducation. During the year, we 
heard from many notable American 
women, enjoyed many marvelous 
concerts written and performed by 
women, and attended various lectures 
pertaining to women's issues. But be- 
fore we look forward, we must take 
a step back and see how we all got 
here. 

In the fall of 1891, Washington 
College admitted eleven women into 
its academic student community. And 
in 1 895, this small liberal arts college 
on the Chester graduated its first fe- 
male student, Mary L. Matthews 
Jones. The majority of female stu- 
dents at Washington College, be- 
tween 1891 and 1911, were here to 
obtain a "Normal degree." This Nor- 
mal curriculum was a two year pro- 
gram by which the female students 
could earn their teaching certificate. 



enabling them to teach in Maryland's 
elementary schools. By 1911, only 14 
of the 1 46 female students had earned 
their bachelor's degree. The admin- 
istration, due to a perceived weak- 
ening of the liberal arts curriculum 



WASHINGTON 
COLLEGE 




CENTENARY of 
COEDUCATION 



by the popularity of the Normal cur- 
riculum, discontinued the two year 
program and subsequently closed 
Normal Hall (now Reid dormitory). 
In 1919, Normal Hall was reopened, 



and the female students who enrolled 
"expected to share fully in the liberal 
arts experience." It was not until 1 97 1 
that female students were given the 
same rights and privileges as their 
male counterparts; however, this does 
not necessarily mean they were seen 
as equal. 

So in 1991, 1992, we gathered to 
celebrate our coeducation: we cele- 
brated one hundred years of living 
together: men and women in America 
— Past, Present, and Future. We vis- 
ited the art exhibits featuring the 
work of regional women artists. We 
listened to concerts featuring women 
composers. We awarded honorary 
degrees to prominent women honor- 
ing their "achievements in education, 
the arts and sciences, and public sen- 
ice." We have been lectured to by 
notable women on various topics per- 
taining to women. .'\nd now those of 
us who are so fortunate to graduate 
from Washington College this pres- 
tigious year are ready to go out into 
the world and affirm the fact that it 
was indeed a glorious day in the fall 
of 1891 when Washington College 
admitted the first female students. 





GREEK SYSTEM 



THROUGH THE GREEKVINE 



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he Greek system has 
provided approximate- 
ly 25% of its under- 
graduate students with the op- 
portunity to learn about lead- 
ership, friendship, and com- 
mitment. 

WC is home to three soror- 
ities and four fraternities: AXfl, 
A0n, ZTA, KA, OX, •J'AO, and 
AHA. Each of these organi- 
zations sponsors a number of 
annual events attended by the 
entire campus. The sisters of 
AXfl host Casino Night in 
Hynson Lounge, while the 
AOn's can be found delivering 
singing telegrams, complete 
with carnation, for Valentine's 
Day. The sisters of Zeta Tau 
Alpha are famous for their 
Back to the WAC and post 
New Year's parties. The broth- 
ers of Theta Chi sponsor the 
annual Heineken party, and 
Need your laundry done, your 
room cleaned? Hire a Theta as 
your "slave for a day." The 
brothers of Kappa Alpha host 
Room-to-Room and St. Patty's 
Day bash, while the Phi Delts 
sponsor the beginning of the 
year crabfeast. 

Fraternities and sororities 
are not all social fun and games. 
Academics are also very im- 
portant to these organizations. 
The Interfraternity-Sorority 
Loving Cup, awarded to the 
fraternity and sorority with the 
highest GPA, was earned this 
year by the brothers of Kappa 
Alpha and the sisters of Zeta 
Tau Alpha. Congratulations 
and keep up the good work! 



l^AO -AOA 




aZTA 

> -AHA 

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Full name: 

Stefanie Alexandra Winter 

Hometown: 

Heusenstamm, Germany 

University: 

Johannes Gutenberg Universitat 
City: 

Mainz 

Subject studied at home: 

American Studies, Russian, Business 
Administration 



Full name: 

Eric Schaefer 

Hometown: 

Marne-LaVallee 

University: 

Universitite Paris 

XII 

City: 

Creteil 

Subject studied at 
home: 

American Studies 




What do you hope t 
learn while in th 
United States? 



"ENG 



Full name: 

Alberto de Castro Gil 

Hometown: 

Madrid, Spain 

University: 

Universitas Nebrisensis 

City: 

Madrid 

Subject studied at home: 

Economics 






What do you hope to 
learn while in the United 
States? 

"To become almost bi- 
lingual (if ever possible) 
and to learn how to live 
in a culture that is sim- 
ilar to my homecountry 
— and yet so differ- 
ent." 




LISH!" 



What do you hope to 
learn while in the United 
States? 

"I want to learn Eng- 
lish, principally. Fur- 
thermore, I hope to im- 
prove my economics 
knowledge in order to 
get a good job in my 
country. I also want to 
learn a little bit about 
American culture." 



INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 



AROUND THE 

WORLD AT 
THE I-HOUSE 




he language assistant 
program at Washing- 
ton College is a unique 
one, owing to the small size of 
our institution. Students, usu- 
ally at the graduate level, are 
hired for one full year at WC. 
In return for tuition stipends, 
assistants are expected to pro- 
vide a link to a foreign culture 
and language which students 



here might not otherwise re- 
ceive. Assistants work in the 
language lab and provide help 
with papers and assignments. 
They also help professors grade 
exams, much like a teaching 
assistant. Most important, lan- 
guage assistants are not only 
our teachers, but also our 
friends. 










THE BOOKSTORE 



COVERED IN 
WC 




e've all had that 
same experi- 
ence. You go to 
the bookstore at the begin- 
ning of the semester, and the 
lines are so long that you de- 
cide to browse around for a 
while. Mom and Dad get the 
bill and they can't believe 
how much your books cost. 
What they don't realize is 
that you've picked up eve- 
rything from the front door 
to the checkout counter. 

The WC bookstore has T- 
shirts, sweats, boxers, bibs, 
and even winter jackets with 
some form of the WC em- 
blem. You realized that you 
could drink out of WC glass- 
es and mugs. You could write 



with WC pens and pencils, 
and take notes in the latest 
WC notebook, which only 
costs $2.00 extra for the WC 
emblem. You could write to 
your friends on WC station- 
ery and keep your college 
memories forever in a WC 
photo album. There's WC 
biking gear, playing cards, 
ashtrays, thermos bottles, 
and anything else you can 
imagine. The only thing the 
bookstore doesn't sell is a 
WC toilet seat. 

So you racked up a bill 
that was over $400 — Mom 
and Dad don't need to know 
that you never actually 
bought your books. 










\ 





EATING 



C-TOWN 
CUISINE 



Let's face it. The dining 
hall food doesn't always 
cut it. Two hours after din- 
ner most stu- 
dents find 
themselves 
with the un- 
controllable 
craving for 
that five let- 
ter word: PIZZA! Luckily, 
Procolino's and Pizza Hut 
are just a phone call away. 
When not in the mood for 
pizza, students are able to 
turn to Subway for quick 
sub delivery. Willing to 
bring food to one's door 
even late at night, these res- 
taurants prevent tired stu- 
dents from having to brave 
a cold winter night in 




search of much needed en- 
ergy and nourishment. 
Burger King is as close to 
McDonalds 
as we can 
get in Ch- 
estertown, 
and the 
college 
snack bar's 
new hours are more ac- 
commodating to our 
needs. But for those of us 
studying into the wee 
hours of the morning. 
Smiley' s is the only way 
to go. And how did we 
make it this far without 
the shrimp rolls and Qgg 
foo young from the newly 
opened China House? 








m 






TRTTrT 



STUDYING 

HIT THOSE 
BOOKS 

Js it hard? Of course sis, and the hst goes on. 
it's hard — if it Study, study, study, 
were easy, this wouldn't be Whether it's in the library, 
college! 
Somewhere 
amidst all 
the athletic 
events, dra- 
ma produc- 
tions, guest 
speakers, 
and those 
soap operas 
that you just 
can't tear 
yourself 
away from, 
we have to 
make time 

for those endless calculus friend, 
problems, lab reports, Eng- vision, 
lish papers, mid-terms, the- bar . . . 




outside on 
the front 
porch, in a 
deserted 
room on the 
third floor 
of Bill 

Smith, or in 
the comfort 
of your own 
dorm room, 
we all need 
to find that 
"perfect" 
place — 
with a 

in front of the tele- 
in the snack 






FIRST SNOWFALL OF THE YEAR 

LET IT SNOW 
LET IT SNOW 
LET IT SNOW! 






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WORKING OUT 



SWEAT 
PUSH, PUMP, 




etting in shape and 
keeping fit requires a 
lot of hard work and 
determination. WC students 
dedicated to the pursuit of the 
body beautiful can be found 
working their bodies in a num- 
ber of places both on and off 
campus. 

The Casey swim center of- 
fers students an Olympic size 
pool complete with lifeguards 
and diving boards. Students 
and professors as well enjoy 
running or jogging the track 
surrounding Kibler field. The 
tennis courts are just a few 
steps beyond the track if you 



want to practice your back- 
hand. The Cain Athletic Cen- 
ter provides a full-size gym, 
dance studio, and weight room, 
containing ergs, freeweights, 
nautilus machines, exercycles, 
and much more. There are aer- 
obics classes as well as jazz and 
ballet, and the Kent County 
Athletic Club, located just be- 
hind campus, also offers aero- 
bics classes and weightlifting. 
So whether you're striving 
for that perfect body, or if you 
just want to burn off last night's 
beer and pizza, WC athletics is 
the place to be! 







HALLOWEEN 



DRESS UP 




hosts. Goblins. 
Witches. Remember 
when we were young? 
We looked forward to that one 
day a year that we could go to 
people's houses disguised as our 
favorite heroes or monsters and 
collect a bag full of candy and 
other goodies. What a great 
deal! So here we are at college, 
and we're expected to act ma- 
ture and serious. We've got to 
learn to contribute to society. 
Fortunately, at Washington 
College, we can still look for- 
ward to Halloween and con- 
tribute to society at the same 
time. This year, the Phi Delts 



and the sisters of ZTA turned 
the basement of Minta Martin 
into a haunted house for the 
neighborhood children. Other 
dorms on campus participate 
in the festivities as well; resi- 
dents love to dress up and greet 
their tiny visitors with delicious 
treats. 

When the last of the trick- 
or-treaters have finally gone 
home, it's time for the college 
kids to go out and play. From 
the frat houses to the hill dorms 
to the Literary House, students 
can always find a place to party 
on Halloween night. 






MUSIC 



BACH'S LUNCH 




he first Bach's Lunch of the aca- 
demic year is held in the early 
fall, when the 
air is still warm and 
before the trees have 
shed their leaves. This 
performance gives mu- 
sic students a chance to 
showcase Baroque 
composers like Vival- 
di, Handel, Telemann, and of course. 
Bach. As the name suggests, the concert 




is a perfect opportunity for faculty and 

students alike to enjoy lunch outside, ac- 
companied by the ele- 
gant strains of the 
harpsichord. Once held 
under the outstretched 
branches of the elm, 
the library terrace pro- 
vides a suitable and 
pastoral setting for the 

first yearly presentation of the Washington 

College Music Department. 






GOOD TIMES, GOOD FRIENDS 

WINDING 
DOWN 




fter a long, hard day 
of classes, practice, 
and countless meet- 
ings, we all need to wind down 
in our own special way. The 
coffee house is home to pool 
tables, arcade games, and ping- 
pong during the week, and spe- 



cial events such as the Disco 
Revival, which allows students 
to let loose on the weekends. 
Some students prefer the social 
ambiance of Andy's, Newt's or 
the Vern, while others are quite 
content to relax among friends 
in their own rooms. 







. BSjSfl^in 











RENAISSANCE DINNER 



16TH CENTURY 




taste of the sixteenth 
century comes to WC 
in the form of the an- 
nual Renaissance Dinner, held 
every year around Christmas 
time. This year's event was a 
fine mixture of music, dancing, 
and food — all in the old style. 
The evening begins with a 
greeting from the lords and la- 
dies of the hall, in the name of 
Lord Phillip, the host. Guests 
are treated to songs and music 



of the period before feasting 
upon traditional fare, includ- 
ing the boar's head. Dancers in 
magnificent costumes prance 
lightly to Pavanes and Ga- 
vottes. The entire hall is fes- 
tooned with holly and pine 
branches, which help transport 
one back to the days of knights 
and chivalry. The only thing 
lacking is a sword fight, mus- 
keteer style — maybe next 
year! 






OFF CAMPUS 



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INDEPENDENCE 




Iou may remember it. May- 
be you were walking 
through Chestertown and 
thought to yourself, "This place is 
beautiful." Or perhaps you decided 
you missed your dog too much to 
live without him for another year. 
Perhaps, warm and cozy, you got 
sick of yet another 2 a.m. fire drill. 



we can't afford that much!" And 
then the memories of the lease — 
"You want two months rent 
now?!!??" Coming back to Wash- 
ington College had become easier 
over the years; the roads were more 
familiar, and you had moved your 
life's possessions many times before 
— it was a piece of cake. This time, 



But it also didn't take long for 
reality to set in. Classes demanded 
most of your time, and you suddenly 
realized that you had to wait until 
you actually cooked your fofxl to eat. 
You realized the bathroom wasn't 
getting any cleaner, and you started 
hating your housemate's habit of 
leaving dirty dishes under the sofa. 
Your friend's cute kitty became a 
heinous beast once it started waking 
you up at 4 am. Laundry no longer 
meant a trip down to the basement, 







Or maybe you just got a lousy num- 
ber at room draw and feared getting 
stuck with a roommate in Kent. So 
the story goes. Ready for a change 
of pace, you and some friends de- 
cided it was time to make the BIG 
MOVE off campus. 

By the time you arrived the fol- 
lowing year, you'd forgotten the 
traumas associated with finding a 
suitable residence. Lost in the back 
of your mind were images of the 
search — "No, we want to bring 
our pet ferrets; we want singles, NO! 



however, along with your clothes, 
pictures and stereo, you brought 
pots, pans and maybe even a vac- 
uum cleaner. 

It was easy to fall in love with 
your own place those first few days. 
No classes, no cleaning to do (yet), 
and if you were lucky, a kitchen well 
stocked by Mom and Dad. This was 
the life — no more confinement to 
a cubicle. No more communal bath- 
rooms, no more RA's to hassle you 
about quiet hours. Total independ- 
ence — could life get any better? 



but a trip down the block. Yes. RA's 
were a thing of the past, but that 
only meant that the cops came to 
shut you up instead, \^'orse \et. the 
name on the lease was YOURS, and 
when the landlord wanted money, it 
wasn't Daddy he called. But at least 
it was your place. Imperfect as it 
was, with leaky faucets and drafty 
floors and windows, it was all yours. 
And when it came time to think 
about housing for the following year, 
you just somehow couldn't bring 
yourself to sign up for room draw. 







Dorm Life. One of the biggest 
transitions a new student has 
to make is the move from his 
or her safe, secure home environ- 
ment, with hot and cold running wa- 
ter, a bed with sheets on it, and a fully 
stocked refridgerator, to the "any- 
thing goes" atmosphere, where the 
bathroom sare a small step above re- 
pulsive, the showers alternate be- 
tween icy-cold and boiling hot with- 
out warning, and the only thing in the 
fridge is a stale piece of pizza and 
some beer. 

Dorm life isn't all that bad. Yes, 
inevitably the person with the worst 
taste in music will have the loudest 



stereo, and you usually ahve to cart 
your laundry at least three or four 
flights of stairs only to find that the 
one working washing machine has a 
three mile line of dirty clothes in front 
of it. But there are some advantages 
to dorm life — you live with a group 
of people who ultimately become your 
firends; you learn to become selfsuf- 
ficient, and best of all, you can do 
whatever you want, when ever you 
want. 

So the big question remains: Where 
do you want to live? Well, the choices 
are many. For those who prefer to live 
rather independently, there are the 
cardinal dorms. These four man huts 




%,mMM& 



are equipped with a full kitchen, 
bathroom, and four bedrooms, almost 
like home. There are also some spe- 
cial interest housing units, such as 
East Hall fo International students, 
and West Hall for science majors. 
One can also choose between the sin- 
gle-sex communities of Reid and 
Queen Anne, and the co-ed realm of 
Talbot, Kent, or Caroline. 

You may even decide that you've 
become tired of dorm life and wihs 
to move off campus. But just remem- 
ber — no matter where you live, Pro- 
colino's still delivers! 




REID HALL 

m 




First Floor: Heather Scholtz, Susan Czechowski, Sabrina Kenny. Justine De Santis. Ashley 
Holladay, Suzanne Fischer, Mary Thomas, Diana Clausen, Renee Alien. Rachel Fink, Erin 
Elliot, Stephanie Evans, Cheryl Rinehart, Kate Towery, Elizabeth Pruett 




Second Floor. Sharon Bonner. Kimberly Coburn, Carolyn Coleman. Julie Klein, .Amy McCleary, 
Elizabeth O'Hara, Mary Crandall, Jenifer Blenckstone, Laura Hammond, Kara Weisenbaugh, 
Belinda McLeod, Caroline Kelly, Amy Barrel!. Bridgette Avant, Adrienne Carr, Stephany 
Slaughter, Teresa Cropper, Melissa Sirick, Elaine Rively 




Third Floor: Karen Brady. Margaret Doyle, MoUie Storke, Jennifer Hagey. Jennifer Clarke, 
Pamela Feeney, Deborah Harner. Lara Buchanan, Lori Hastings. Teri Tegtmeier. Katberine 
Simms, Amy Hanes. Laura Heidel, Emily Daignault, Heather Feezer, Susan Wiater. Jennifer 
Ruppert, Eve Zartmen, Melanie Wentzell, Tonya Howell, Paula DeStefano, Sherry Mer.ton, 
Abrah Wilberding 

DORM LIFE 51 



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First Floor: Jennifer Sloan, Julie Dill, Sharon Davis. Evelyn Beale, Courtney Grady, Mary 
DeVries, Sara Boggess, Cynthia DeWaters, Theresa Sganga, Theresa Lerch, Karen Reck, Amy 
Osbourne, Kirsten Lucas, Amy Dezseran, Renee Rhodes, Alexis Vandernat, Jennifer Gilday, 
Barbara Kelly, Susan Huntley, Kimberly Van Keuren, Maria Banashak, Catherine Kopay, 
Jemima LaClair, Suzanne MazzuUo, Renee Guckert, Jill Spruill, Marianne Culbertson, Karen 
Westing, Tiffany Altizer, Amy Draper, Sandra McLelland, Christine Smith, Reesa Kuhnel, 
Merritt Pridgeon, Caroline Jensen, Kristine Karns, Elizabeth Hocker, Lisa Katchadurian, Claire 
Guerin, Stephanie Fidler, Suzanne Woolens, Christabel Garcia-Zamor 




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Second FloorJill Sakaduski, Rachel Spellar, Alexandra Moringiello, Amy Emmons, Elizabeth 
Carrone, Stephanie Sail, Nora Garcia, Jamee Damron, Jennifer Schaefer, Diana Holton, Joan 
Colton, Jennifer Sendax, Sarah Bauer, Jennifer Green, Berna Kemahli, Jacqueline Clements, 
Monita Airen, Sarah Young, Suzanne Nichols. Jennifer Sponseller, Melissa Wentzell, Tina 
Welch, Jean Ames, Julia Merrell, Catherine Rogers, Allison Worrell, Joy Pinchot, Margaret 
Wadsworth, Leslie Newcomb, Elizabeth Reilly. Anne Loverro. Brook Tyrer, Molly Blake, Alicia 
Carberry, Megan McCurdy, Shane-Erin Dwyer, Mary Devlin, Alexandra Geller, Jennifer Born- 
friend, Marisol Gallardo, Megan Ward, Mary Price Wick, Karen Wright 







Third Floor Franci Green, Mary K. Brewster, Traci Castello, Marion McDermaid, Christy 
Harris. Kristin Phalen, Natalie Guiberson, Kristen Kujawski, Karen Scott, Helen Marshall, 
Meredith McPherson, Andrea Nolan, Tammie Michener, Margaret Wurts, Jacqueline Richards, 
Alicia Jones, April DeMar, Tammie Silva. Susan Himmelheber, Stefany Wolfe, Wendy Debnam, 
Barbara Stuart, Christy Waters 

52 DORM LIFE 




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QUEEN ANNE 





First Floor: June O'Neal, Andrea Butchart. Nicole Van Neel. Jennifer Dougherty, Marie Mohler, 
Elisabeth Aylesworth, Jessica Hall, Karen Bianchini, Junnifer Saunders, Forrest George, Jen- 
nifer Del Nero, Rachel Brown, Tanya Allen, Erika Fitzhugh, Julie Lippke Susan Daisley, Erin 
Jacobsen, Lisa Brown, Magdalena Fuchs, Melissa Sullivan, Stacy Sherman, Leeann Steuer 




Second Floor: Ivette Gormez, Julia Scheid, Karla Pozo, Michelle Sheppard, Tara Rathel, Victoria 
Kealy, Tamela Pinkney, Zylia Knowlin, Heather DeNatale, Jenny Rock, Elizabeth Bigham, 
Kathryn Mullen, Tina McCuen, Bridgetie Ferris, Lisa Jones, Martha Kimura, Adria Nesberg, 
Amy Swain, Carmcl Earnshaw, Nicole Falanga. Jennifer Webb, Cathy Lease, Christina Al- 
bright. Dawn Israel. Grin Page, Stefanie Lee, Amy Undercoffler, India Henson 



54 DORM LIFE 






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CAROLINE 




First Floor: Beverly Diaz. Wendy Kraus, Danielle Miller, Nancy Millhouser, Dawn Brown, Amy 
Bortmes, Sabrina Luginbuhl, Erika Schoenwald, Cheryl Bull, Jennifer Oberle, Jennifer Tower, 
Sonja Wilson, Eleanor Shriver, Nicole Robinson, Michelle Russo, Curtia Arnold, Curtina Ar- 
nold, Pai Yeh, Niurka Goenaga, Monica McDowell, Ilaine Goldsmith, Jennifer Fellows, Caroline 
Frazer 





Second Floor: David George, Jason Myers, Brett Showalter, James Delahay, Brendan Norris, 
Brian Wilson, Christopher Welch, Michael Bowman, Daniel Coker, John Bowers, Michael Mu- 
cha, Joseph Ryan, Todd Stephenson, Jesse Cook, Charles Linehan, Christian Boone, Matthew 
Zarinko. Graham Munda, Nathan Wiedwald, Timothy Reardon, Timothy Whittier, Jonathan 
Elmo. Joshua Rosenstock, Luther Dudich, Christopher Goldenberg 




Third Floor: Ivan Schwabe, James Baker, Charles Goode, John Nunn, Patrick Lebowitz, Leslie 
White, Deirdre Swinden. lustin Cann, Keith Daniels. Janviere Thuman, Christin Albert. Abigail 
Clifford, Brad Castleman, Rdward Harned, Chris Mihavelz, Roxanne Seubert, Brian Tarlelon, 
Adam Brown, Tina Dayhoff, Elisa Hale, Michael Sapp, Jay Devlin, Jason Rondstadt 

56 DORM LIFE 




HILL DORMS 



EAST 

I Iv'mLalaM 




MIDDLE 
HALL 



WEST 
HALL 





Alexis Nasjletti, Anthony Wright, Brian Gimelson, Anna Herrmann, Susan Wackerbarth, Mi- 
chael Frey, R.J. Eldridge, Mary Speer, Greg Hickman, Troy Petenbrink. Andrew McKim, 
Ciaran O'Keefe, Joseph Koskuba, Stefanie Winter, Alberto Castro, Stephen Dadzie, Maria 
Jerardi, Lucinda Young, Chris Spezio, 




Anthony Forti, Christian Kubick, Charles Bucknor, Joseph Girdner, Thomas Veith, Giles Beale, 
Charles Spruill, Matthew Monacelli, Edward McGill, Don Wilson, Jason Kraus, Jeffrey Grafton. 
Paul Mullin, Mitchell O'Shea, Richard Gardiner, Gordon Scherer, David Littleton, Jarrod 
Wunderlich, Dennis Kelleher, Jeffrey Bauman, John Beachley, Brian Basso, Andrew Parks, 
Thad Ulrich, Thomas Leigh, David Dietz, Mark Dietz 




Jeanine Bilderback, Patricia Karnes, Don Pfister, Miriam Jecelin, Susan Alexander, .\le3candra 
Nader, Constance Pope, Kristin Coyne, Valerie Neidig, Kristin Liebig, Kathleen Carroll, Mich- 
elle Crosier, Christina Rummell, Lisa-Marie Castro, Jennifer Trapnell, Drew Mace, Lisa Blame 



DORM LIFE 59 



WICOMICO 





■y 



f %^ j^— 



First Floor: Kyle Hutchison, Christopher Vaughn. John Semmes. Harry Rienhoff, Christopher Kleiberg, 
Christina Graham, Chris Sanchez, Rory Conway, John Boyle, James Bonsack, Matthew Johnson, WUliam 
Brimhall 




Second Floor: Thomas Canova, Huger Sinkler, Peter Greene, Jon Clayton, Lewis Beirne, Whitney Myrus, 
Max Walton, Joshua Obercian, Andrew Evans, Christopher Freisheim, David Czekaj, Peter Mugar, David 
Dennehy, Jonathan Alexander, William Millington, Bradley Harris. Tyler McCarthy, Matthew Newkirk, 
Jerry Davis 



60 DORM LIFE 



WORCESTER 




First Floor: Timothy Peters, Eric Jewett, Tim Stoltzfus, Deepak Raja, Sokhon Pin, Benjamin Smyth, Marc 
Satterfield, Angel Gatell, Anthony Higgins, Terence Russel, Jason Truax, Michael Tyson 




Secoad Floor: William Ball, Timothy Buckheit, Wayne Marshall, John Phoebus, Nicholas Armentrout, 
Mary Bird, Laura Green, Michelle Harrison, Salwa Amer, Doug Peterson, John Harris, Thomas Shepherd, 
Ari Kodeck, Kristin McMenamin, Laura Rindfuss 



DORM LIFE 61 



NEW DORMS 




CECIL 
HOUSE 



Catherine Cole, Tracy Greenawalt, Anastasia Vendelis, Katrina Beernink, Karen Stritehoff, 
Kathleen Robbins, Joseph Boan, Geoffrey Rupert, Greg Rogers, Rachel Rice, Miriam Dittmann, 
Adriane Beane, Matthew Wolpoe, Michael Ratta, Curtis Campbell, David Ratta, James Carver, 
Stuart Warner, Christopher Jones, William Brandenburg, Gerald Sarno, Jonathan Mulvaney, 
Benjamin Ward, Greg Mouracade, Ryan Mahoney. 




DORCHESTER 
HOUSE 



Jeffrey Lim, Mark Phaneuf, Keith Whiteford, Kristopher Murphy, Scott Cole, Brian Walters, 
Vincent Sanudo, Nathaniel Parker, David Snyder, Terence McCabe, Peter Jons, John McCarthy, 
Scott Verstandig, Lance Mercereau, Thomas Obara, Raymond Herndon, Spencer Beck, Geoffrey 
Simms, Jonathan Seal, Darren Vican, Michael Swanson, William Halagarda, Brian Ford, Wayne 
Sprouse, 




TALBOT 
HOUSE 



Nicole Bachinsky, Susan Koch, Sarah Duffy, Christine Abbott, Brenda Stanley, Nora Sullivan, 
Heather Mayr, Deborah Boyer, Erin Ruhl, Kristin Hilgartner, Allen Lester, Peter Basel, Daniel 
Dutton. Tim Johnson, Jeffrey Lane, David Hanifee, Lawrence Taylor, James Hanifee, Annie 
Veiga, Deirdre Riegel, Keri Nygaard, Dan Kretzer, Francis Benson, John Griep, John Blakelock 



62 DORM LIFE 




DORM LIFE 63 




mmm. 







iloSoup 
3 Cheese 
Awch 

JRoastBeel 
iCroesanl 



eseMancott 
helli w/3 Sauces 
ned Fresh 
BrtngCanols 



Bread 
CootueCake 



TIKISDAV 
WC Egg McMuffin 
Pancake Bar 
Blueberry & Apple 
Donut Holes 



"New England 

ClamChowter 
CTown Sleak 

Sandwich 
Chicken Salad 
Fned Monterey 

Jack Cheese Slicks 
w/Sauoe 
WhileCake 

w/Chocolate long I 

Floasted Breast of Turkey i 
Crepe Cup Fbrerrtine | 
Whipped FWatoes i 

Steamed Fresh Broccoli 
PaiiRoKs i 

Pumpkin Pie 
W/Whip Topping 



\Vl:l)NISI)A>' 
Fned Eggs to Order 
French Toast Biir 
Sticky Buns 



Homemade Turkey 
Minestrone Saip 
Asst Sokan Piz^ns 
Liver w/Omons 
Shnmp Salad 
Jumbo Chocolate 
Chip Cookies 



Hunter's Pork FtoasI 
Tn-Cokxed TorteUm 
w/SauoB 



IIIHKSDAV 
Saambled Eggs 
Slutted in n 
Pita Pockot 
Scrapple 
Pancake EVir 
Banana Bread 



FOB THR W 

I KIDAY 
Creamed Chip B« 
ovor Wattles 
hAnh Breaktast E( 
Cinnamon Bow T 



Sugar Snap Peas 
ComPuddng 
HomeavlB Bread 



ClieeseSoup 
Gnlled Flueben 

Sandwich 
Sliced Turtvey 

on a Kaser 
Spinacti Soultle 
Peanut Butter 

Brownie Squares 



ClLMTT) Ol [VDCUA .'i(XP 

(to-l-aed bit' jntjip 

H*«f f ri'sM f-li Urts 
l'.Vf«lyBunmK) 
NiPwColJow 

^;iii.in»id 

Miinitf> v.-jf 'LiiiiM^ 



BeeFBaiJey Soup 
Turkey TacoPita 
Fned Fish Sandw 

on a Mjltigran p 
Mm Pretzels 
Ice Youf CVm 

Cupcakes 



WCUicySub 
Baked Fish Filel 
Fned Potato Skms 
w/Sour Cream & 
Chives 



Fresh CauHtowBi 
wCheeseSauc 



4 k 



KENT HOUSE 




An^tntt 26 - 31, 1991 

SAP KDAY ] 

i Bluefaeny Pancake Bar" ^ 
Homeniad*,' Donuts 
Bagels w/Ocam Chccs« 
S014) du Jour 
Croissant w/Sliced Ham 
& Amencan Cheese 
Thm Cut Frencfi Fnes 

I Chici<ehKiev ' 

w/Supreme Sauce 
Fettuam 
w.Clam Sauce 
Brown Rce 
Sigafne O Ffesti 
Green Beans 
Itaiian Bnaad 
GoUenCake 
j vwFudge tang 



T 



_ SUNDAY 
Fned Eggs to Order 
Rise & Shine Crepes 
Bacon 
Homemade 

Belgan Wattles 
AssI Pastnes 

nSajBeS SantJwicti 

Fned Clam Strips 
Home Fnes 
Steamed CatTDts 
Ftye Bread 
Make Your Own 
Sundaes 



RESPONSES TOTliE NAPKIN BOARD 



First Floor North: Tarin Towers, Andrew Stone, Steven Brown, Rebecca Bryant, Tanya Cunic, 
Amy Caddie, Kristin Lewis, Josepli Hamilton, Cleo Patterson, Christina Lancaster, Mathew 
Zimmerman, James Ginther, Gehrett Ellis 




First Floor Soutli: Daniel Hoak. John Thomas, Eric Dalessio. James Alvarez, Jeffrey Sawyer, 
Jonathan Rogers, Charles Cummings, Andrew Wood, Brooke Frank. Michael D'Andrea. Greg 
Lawler, Kevin Lawner, Lionel Dyson, David Cole, Jason Campbell, Christopher Berghaus. 
Steven Proakis, Ethan Maxwell, Benjamin Simmons, David Riddiford 



DORM LIFE 65 



KENT HOUSE 




Second Floor South: Marci Duffy, Jennifer Hozik, Elizabeth Clementson, Tristan Allen, Kristin Warner, 
Christina Sturges, Katina Duklewski, Traci Gray, Julia Nordhoff. Julie Greene, Nancy Whiteman. Kristen 
Hamilton, Alexandra Baez, Susan Batten, Dawn Jarboe, Wendi Eskridge 




Second Floor North: Andrew Tarrant, Brian Matheson, Sherrie Rodney. Erin Talbert, Katherine Degentesh, 
Jessica Boone, Mary Holmes, Melissa Moorehead, Raphael Koster. Gerard Hunt, Kelly Burns, Rachel 
Demma, Sara Hunt. Jennifer Reddish. Tara Kidwell, Scott Graham, Brian Coleman, Edward Elfenbein 



66 DORM LIFE 



SOMERSET 




Second Floor: William P. Gibson, John T. Shannahan, Matthew H. Gallagher. George A. Jamison, John- 
Bruce C. Alexander, Joel E. Brown, Matthew D. Cairns, David Hargett, Matthias Conaty, Michael Ginns, 
Brian Flynn, Jason Paige 



*Photos were not available for Somerset first, third and fourth floors. Residents of 
these floors are as follows: 



First Floor: Alfred Meissner, Kenneth Griffin, Gregory Miller, Miles Truesdell, Joseph Derbis. Geoffrey 
Kneisel, Adam Poe, Eric Henry, Peter Hagen, Brandon White, Michael Hamill 



Third and Fourth Floors: Thomas Leighty, Ronald Jayne, Matthew Lynn, Jonathan Lack, George Holm, 
Scott Shepherd, Kenneth Pipkin, Keith Morgan, Richard McKee, Peter DeJong, Kevin Knox. Samuel 
Bates, Todd Kagler, Glenn Warner 



DORM LIFE 67 



CARDINAL 




James Jenkins, Steven Boucher, Brett McCrea, Greg Coss, Deborah Kulich, Rose Jarboe, Jennifer Griffin, Kathleen Feeney, Rebecca Smith, 
Jennifer Mowll, Kimberly Millender, Shannon Cupka, Bruce Hamilton, Eric Forste, John Bates, Franklin Wildman, Karyn lacangelo, Stephanie 
Sherwell, Kris Wallenburg, John Kelly, Justin Wiest, David Taibl, Edward Greeley, Helene Clifford, Kelly Huber, Vanessa Post, Stephanie 
Hess, Kevin Kelly, Samuel Gessner, Gerald Scully, Christopher Seymour, Michelle Beattie, Lynn Massicot, Sarah McGee, Stephanie Tennyson, 
Greg Giobbe, Andrew Bohutinsky, Jeff Rexford, Edmund Noonan, Michelle Root, Kristina Clary, Pam Hendrickson, Tina Lennon, Tim Liddy, 
David Brightman, John Morrall, Scott Overend, Elizabeth Driscoll, Cynthia Slaby, Margaret Skinner 



68 DORM LIFE 












m 




4 



m wmm 

■..V. rVv'v-' 





70 FACULTY 



HACULT^ 



Charles H. Trout 

President of the College 





72 PRESIDENTS OFFi E AND DEANS 




Dr. John B. Taylor 

Acting Provost, 
Dean of the College 



Dr. Lucille H. Sansing 
Associate Dean of the College 









Edward E. Maxcy 
Associate Dean of Student Affairs 



Maureen K. Mclntire 
Dean of Student .affairs 



PRESIDENTS OFFICE AND DEANS 




Dr. H. Louise Amick 

Visiting Associate Professor of Matliemat- 

ics 

B.A., Washington College 

M.A.. University of Delaware 



Dr. Emilie M. Amt 

Assistant Professor of History 
B.A., Swarthmore College 
D.Phil., University of Oxford 



Dr. Tai Sung An 

Everett E. Nuttle Professor of Poli. Sci. 

B.A., Indiana University 

M.A., Yale University 

Ph.D.. University of Pennsylvania 




Dr. Robert J. Anderson 

Professor of Philosophy 

B.A.. Temple University 

M.A., Yale University 

Ph.D.. Yale University 



William F. Andrews 

Lecturer in Art 

B.A., Washington College 

M.F.A., University of Maryland 



Dr. Andrew Aprill 

Visiting Professor of Psychology 

B.S., Kearney State College 

M.A., Ph.D. candidate. Temple University 








iS'M 


\3iim 

4 










D. v. 


Michael Bailey 


Hodson Trusi 


ifessor of Economics 


Associate Profi. 


of Economics 


B.A.. 


North Tex 


tate University 


Ph,P 


. Univsrsitv 


', 'arvland 



Dr. Lida D. Baldwin 

Assistant Professor of German 
B.A.. Queen College 
M.A., University of Georgia 
Ph.D.. Rutgers University 



Almon C. Barrell, II 

Lecturer in Sociology 
B.A., Washington College 
M.S.W.. University of Maryland 



74 FACULTY 




Dr. Joseph C. Bigott 

Instructor in History 

B.A., Augustana College 

M.A., University of Notre Dame 

Ph.D. candidate, University of Delaware 



Dr. Kevin M. Brien 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 
B.A., Boston University 
M.A., Ph.D., Boston University 




Dr. Albert W. Briggs, Jr. 

Associate Professor of .Mathematics 
B.A., Harvard University 
M.A., University of California Berkeley 
Ph.D., University of Maryland 



■<S^^ 



12 



Dr. Steven Cades 

Associate Professor of Sociology 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Rutgers University 



Dr. Garry E. Clarke 

Professor of Music 
B.Mus., Cornell College 
M.Mus., Yale University 
D. Litt., Washington College 



Dr. John A. Conkling 

Adjunct Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Washington College 

Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University 




Dr. Thomas J. Cousineau 

Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Boston College 

M.A., Ph.D., U. of California Davis 



Dr. Frank J. Creegan 

W. Alton Jones Professor of Chemistry 
B.S.. Merrimack College 
Ph.D., Fordham Universitv 



Dale Daigle 

Assistant Professor of Drama 
B.A.. University of Maine Orono 
M.F.A., Universitv of Hawaii Manoa 



FACULTY 75 




Robert P. Day 

Professor of English 

B.A., M.A.. University of Kansas 

M.F.A., University of Arkansas 



Dr. Richard C. DeProspo 

Associate Professor of English 

B.A.. Yale University 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia 



Dr. Colin Dickson 

Associate Professor of French 

B.A., Amherst College 

M.A.. M.A., Ph.D., U. of Penn. 



<^^^ 




Penny Fall 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 
B.S., Boston University 
M.Ed., Boston College 



Dr. W. Robert Fallaw 

Professor of History 

B.A., Duke University 

M.A., Ph.D., Princeton University 



Dr. .'Vudrey Fessler 

Assistant Professor of English 

B.A.. Bucknell University 

M.A., Ph.D.. University of Michigan 




Thdnias J. Finnegan 
Associate Professor of Physical Education 
B.A., Washington College 
M.L.A., The Johns Hopkins University 



Geraldine C. Fischer 

Tutor in Writing 

B.A., M.A.. University of Maryland 



Dr. Rosemary H. Ford 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
B.S., New Mexico State University 
M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 



76 FACULTY 




-<^^^§^- 




Dr. Richard L. Gillin 

Professor of English 
B.A., William Patterson College 
M.A., St. John's University 
Ph.D.. Bowling Green University 



Alice B. Goodfellow 

Tutor and Coordinator, Writing Program 
B.A., Washington College 
M.A., Washington College 



Dr. Eugene P. Hamilton 

Associate Professor of .Mathematics 
B.S., University of Delaware 
M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University 




photo 

not 

available 



Dr. Patricia E. Home 

Professor of Sociology 

A.A., Long Beach City College 

B.A., Long Beach State College 

M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina 



Dr. Robert Janson-LaPaime 

Associate Professor of Art 

B.A., Brown University 

M.F.A., Ph.D., Princeton University 



Dr. Joyce B. Johnson 

Lecturer of English 




Dr. Gail Kaplan 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Goucher College 

M.S., Ph.D., SUNY Stony Brook 



Dr. Michael T. Kerchner 

Visiting Asst. Prof, of Psychology 
B.S., American International College 
M.S., Ph.D., Lehigh University 



Dr. Janet Kestenberg-.\niighi 

Visting .\sst. Prof, of .Anthropology 
B.A., Colorado State University 
Ph.D., University of .Missouri 



FACULTY 77 





Bennett Lamond 

Professor of English 
B.A., Brooklyn College 
M.A., Fordham University 



Kimberly Lessard 

Aquatic Coordinator 



Dr. Juan Lin 

Associate Professor of Physics 
B.A., University of California Santa Bar- 
bara 
MA. Ph.D.. SUNYSlnnv Brook 



-C^^gi 




-c^^i- 



photo 

not 

available 



Dr. James R. Locker 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Middle Tennessee State University 

Ph.D., Indiana University 



Sylvia S. Maloney 

Lecturer in Education 
B.S., Misericordia College 
M.A., Washington College 



Timothy B. Maloney 

Associate Professor of Drama 

B.A., King's College 

M.A., University of Delaware 




Ann Matthews 

Lecturer in Music 

B.M., M.M., Peabody Conservatory 



Dr. Davy H. McCall 

Lecturer in Economics 
B.A., Kenyon College 
M.A., Ph.D.. Har\'ard University 



Geoffrey M. Miller 

Director of Athletics 



78 FACULTY 




Kathleen Mills 

Associate Professor of Music 
B.M., Cornell College 
M.A., Smith College 

\A M Nlnrthmoctprn 1 Inii/crgity 



Dr. Donald A. Munson 

Professor of Biology 
A.B., Colgate University 
M.A., Adelphi University 

Ph n Ilnivprcily nf Npw Hamp^hirp 



Dr. J. David Newell 

Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Gordon College 

M.Div., Gordon-Conwell Seminar) 




M=-^ 


7 


m 


mt 




WStr^ 



~u — ■ — I — <^^^^^^ 




Dr. Sean F. O'Connor 

Associate Professor of Education 
B.A., University College, Dublin 
M.A., Ph.D., The Catholic University 



Christine A. Pabon 

Lecturer in Modern Languages 
B.A., Washington College 
M.A., Middlebury College 



Dr. Thomas A. Pabon 

Professor of Spanish 
B.A. Hunter College 
M.A., Middlebury College 

Ph n rQt^.r^l,> TIni.,Pr^.-.y 




Mrs. Elizabeth Parcell 

Lecturer in Music 

B.A., M.A., University of Missouri 



Dr. Daniel L. Premo 

Professor of History and Political Science 
B.A., Western Michigan University 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Texas 



Dr. John Rink 

Visiting Asst. Prof, of Poll. Sci. 

B.A., M.A., U. of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 

Ph.D., Southern Illinois V. at Carbondale 




Jason Rubin 

Lecturer in Drama 



Dr. David E. RusseU 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
B.A., Claremont McKenna College 
M.S., California State University 
Ph.D., George Washington University 



Dr. Joacbim J. Scholz 

Associate Professor of German 

Ph.B., Berchmanskolleg 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago 




Dr. Terrence H. Scout 

Associate Professor of Business 
B.S., Shippensburg University 
M.A., Ph.D., U. of Cal. Riverside 
M.B.A.. U. of N.C. at Charlotte 



Dr. Tahir I. Shad 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 
B.A., University of Sussex, U.K. 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 



Dr. Jeanette Sherbondy 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.A., University of Indiana 
Ph.D., University of Illinois 




Dt. George R. Shivers 

Professor of Spanish 

B.A., American University 

M.A.. Ph.D., University of Maryland 



Dr. Sarinder S. Sidhu 

Assistant Professor of Physics 
B.Tech., Indian Institute of Technology 
Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University 



Dr. James R. Siemen 

Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.A., University of Delaware 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Nebraska 



80 FACULTY 




Karen Lynn Smith 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 
B.S.. M.A.. University of Maryland 



Dr. Nathan Smith 

Professor of History 

B.A.. Roosevelt College 

M.A.. Ph.D., University of Illinois 



Dr. George J. .Spilich 

Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.A., University of Wisconsin 
M.A., University of Texas El Paso 
Ph.D.. University of Pittsburgh 




Dr. Richard Striner 

Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., American University 

M.A., Ph.D.. University of Maryland 



Dr. Peter F. Tapke 

Professor of Philosophy 
B.A., Haverford College 
M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University 



Dr. Nancy R. latum 

Ernest .A. Howard Professor of English 
B.A.. University of Arkansas 
M.A.. Ph.D.. Bryn Mawr College 




Gail L. Tubbs 

Tutor in Writing 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College 

M.A., Wesleyan University 



Dr. Raymond F. Turner 

Lecturer in Business Management and Ec- 
onomics 

B.B..A.. M.B.A., University of Cincinnati 
M.A., Ph.D., The Catholic University 



Dr. Kathleen NL VerriUe 

Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S.. College of Mount Saint Vincent 

Ph.D., Universitv of Delaware 



FACULTY 81 




Katherine E. Wagner 

Lecturer in English 

B.A., Washington College 

M.F.A.. University of Massachusetts 



Gerald A. Walsh 

Assistant Professor of Business 
B.S., University of Maryland 
M.B.A.. Loyola College 



Kennetb D. Wantiing 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathemat- 
ics 
B.S., M.S., University of Tennessee 

Ffl <; r.|.r.rnc Wachinjitnn I InJMprgity 




Dr. Edward J.H. Weissman 

Associate Professor of Political Science 

B.A.. Middlebury College 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina 



Donald F. Wierda 

Lecturer in Business 

B.A., University of California Berkeley 

M.B.A., Wilmington College 



Dr. Carol Wilson 

Assistant Professor of History 
B.A., University of Delaware 
M.A., University of Akron 

Ph n Wp»t Virginia 1 Inivprcity 






^:^ 

#1 




TJ 


r 


-l' 



C^^B^ 




Or. Beverly Wolff 

Visiting .Xsiiisiant Professor of English 
B.A.. Uni\r<;iiv of Illinois 
M.A.. Wes; '. hcsier State University 
Ph n , ' '"■'■ -J-v nf niflaaarc 



Jerry W. Wright, Jr. 

Assistant Professor of Business Manage- 
ment 
B.S.. M.B.A., University of Evansville 

M A tnHianQ 1 lnivi»r.:ity 



Dr. Andre F. Yon 

Professor of French 

B.A.. Elizabethtown College 

M.A.. Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State Uni- 

vrcily 



82 FACULTY 



Faculty on leave 

Michael S. Malone 

Amzie Parcell 

Diane Portelance 

Rosette M. Roat 

Sue Tessem 





84 SENIORS 






ENIORS 




ranklin O. Adams 

History 

Memphis, TN 



For God so loved 

the world that he gave His 

only begotten Son, that whoever 

believes in Him should not 

perish 

but everlasting life. 

— John 3:16 



J 



ennifer C. Albers 

Political Science 
Petersburg, Virginia 



"Strange how much you 

know before you know how 

little you know." 

— Anonymous 




86 SENIORS 




atrick Attenasio 

English 
Mountainside, NJ 



"/ insist 

That the old janitor on his deathbed 

Who demands to see the breasts of 

his wife 

For one last time 

Is the greatest poet who ever lived. " 

— Charles Simic 



J 



ohn Christian Griep 

Political Science 

Preston, MD 



"There's only one way to hold a dis- 
trict: you must study human nature 
and act accordin'. You can't study 
human nature in books. Books is a 
hindrance more than anything else. 
If you have been to college, so much 
the worse for you. You'll have to un- 
learn all you have learned before you 
can get down to human nature, and 
unlearnt n' takes a lot of time. Some 
men can never forget what they 
learned at college." 
— Ex-Senator George Washington 
Plunkitt 



J 



ohn Waller Blakelock 

Music 
Princess Anne. MD 



"The great event in my life then was 

the performance of Pierrot Lunaire 

I had heard in December 1912 in 

Berlin." 

— Igor Stravinsky 

EN PASSANT 



SENIORS S" 




icholas R. Armentrout 

English 
Kennebunk, Maine 



Descartes, Freud and Joyce, Mill- 
walkee's Best, Newt's, Cliff City. 
$2 and The Farm Parties. Flunk- 
ing, passing and -A's. W.CR.F.C. 
I don't know, I've learned a lot, most 
of it unconsciously. It's all a dream 
now. Renzi, Carolyn and the Ath- 
ey's, Sarah (Hey Olive Juice!) and 
The Griswolds. Mom and Dad. 
Thank you all. W. C. is not the real 
world, but it is a great prelude to 
it. I only hope that I keep learning. 
Have a good one — Trout — 



M 



aria Banashak 

Psychology 
Baltimore, MD 




SENIORS 




D 



eean Pinczok 

English 
Bethlehem, PA 



"Take time to watch, to wait, to wonder. 
Take time to laugh, to cry, to remember. 
Take time to feel the sunshine, take time 
to touch a raindrop. Just remember . . . 
to take time." 



C 



laudia Baldwin 

Biology 
Lynchburg, VA 



The future is here, we are it, we are on 
our own. 

It takes love over gold and mind over 
matter to do what you feel you must, 
When the things that you hold can fall 
and be shattered or run through your 
fingers like dust. 



J 



ennifer Jaeger 

Sociology 
Kingsville, MD 



"May your heart be always young 
May your dreams live forever 
May your spirit be free." 



lisabeth Knieriem 

History 
Cockeysville, MD 



SENIORS S9 



J 



ohn Beachley 

Political Science 
Grasonville, MD 



"Thanks to all those 
who made these past 
four years memo- 
rable. You will nev- 
er be forgotten. 
Good luck, God 
bless, and may the 
force be with you 
all. Mom and Dad, 
I did it. Thanks for 
everything. I love 
you." 



J 



eff Bauman 

Business 
Belle Mead, NJ 



T 



had Ulrich 

Political Science 
Ocean View, DE 



"Thanks to all my 
family and friends 
who helped me get 
through these past 
four years. And in 
the spirit of Kappa 
Alpha Order: "Dieu 
et les Dames." It's 
been a blast. God 
Bless!" 



"Four years and a lot of beers. 
Thank God it's over." 



R 



ichard H. Gardiner 



Biology 
Belair Bel Air, MD 

"After these four years I've seen new 
things, and done new and different 
things, but most importantly grown and 
learned more than ever before. (Hope- 
fully for $17,000 a year! SEE YA!) 




90 SENIORS 




V: 



B 



nan A. Basso 

Biology 
Lexington Park, MD 



To be one is unique. 

To be many is brotherhood 

— KAO 

To love is to be found anew 

— KMC 



eryan Beacham 

Humanities 
Atlanta, GA 



// there's a bustle in your hedge- 
row 

Don't be alarmed now. 
It's just a spring clean for the 
May -Queen. 

Yes, there are two paths you can 
go by. 

But in the long run 
There is still time to change the 
road you are on. 

I would like to thank my loved ones: 
God, Moma, Daddy, Honey and 
Ben. 




SENIORS 91 




Bates 

Biology 
Lutherville, Maryland 



This is for all those who are my true friends. "Mama mama many worlds I've 
known since I first left home." So ends adolescence. Those last few years have 
been spent learning, and oh the things Tve been taught! "I remember breezes 
from winds inside your body keep me high. Like I told you III sing to them 
this story and know why." The feelings of anticipation have turned to appre- 
hension. The world outside of C-town is scary, ominous. One must pick one's 
path wisely in the real world. We've just been having a trial and error session. 
Now's the real test . . . Mom, Dad, Med, DTR, JPH, VW, HH, MM, JB, GW. 
BB, myself. 



JVatrina C. Beernink 

English 
Sparks, Maryland 



CMCtll£P fl 

LUMTT OH 
£S NMTT ^H 

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■Ml ^H 






J 



92 SENIORS 




A 



L 



isa Blume 

Biology 
Farmland, Pennsylvania 

Laughing is what gives us 
perspective, keeps us sane 
and communicating with 
each other. 

"Don't criticize what you 
can't understand." — B. 
Dylan 

"Peace is not something 
you wish for; it's some- 
thing you make, some- 
thing you do, something 
you are, and something 
you give away!" — R.F. 



driane Beane 

Business Management 
Bethesda, Maryland 



Hello My Friends, 

It is time for L.L. to close up shop. 
Rach, we've come a long way, baby! 
You're a star! And as for you, "shit- 
for-eyes," thanks for your love and 
companionship. And to the rest of 
L.L.'s friends, you have all meant 
the world to me and will be greatly 
missed. Mom and Dad, I couldn't 
have asked for better parents! Good- 
bye my friends. Love, L.L. 




SENIORS 93 



enifer Blenckstone 

History 
Baltimore, Maryland 




YOU DO NOT HAVE TO BE 
YOUR MOTHER 

unless she is who you want to 
be. You do not have to be your 
mother' s mother, or your 
mother's mother's mother, or 
even your grandmother' s 
mother on your father's side. 
You may inherit their chins or 
their hips or their eyes, but you 
are not destined to become the 
women who came before you, 
you are not destined to live 
their lives. So if you inherit 
something, inherit their 
strength. If you inherit some- 
thing, inherit their resilience. 
Because the only person you 
are destined to become is the 
person YOU DECIDE to be. 
— NIKE 



94 SENIORS 



M 



ary Colleen Blenckstone 

History 
Chestertown, Maryland 




Summer delights the scholar 
With knowledge and reason: 
Who is happy in hedgerow 
Or meadow as he is? 

Paying no dues to the parish, 
He argues in logic 
And has no care of cattle 
But a satchel and stick 

The showery air grows softer, 
He profits by his ploughhand. 
For the share of the school- 
men 
Is a pen in hand . . . 

— Gaelic poem 



li^haron L. Bonner 

English 
Baltimore, Maryland 

"My own voice cheered me, and, 
far more, the mind's 
Internal echo of the imperfect 
sound; 

To both I listened, drawing from 
them both 

A cheerful confidence in things to 
come." 

Wordsworth 
The Prelude Book First 
My love to all my family, to Chris, 
Rachael, Maria, Kim, R.J., Brian, 
Sam, Christian, and everybody at 
the I-house. 




SENIORS 95 



Oteven Boucher 

Political Science 
Reisterstown, Maryland 

I've found that Washington 
College can be many different 
things and that nobody's view 
of this place is like anyone 
else's. To me, W.C. has meant 
a lot of hard work, but plenty 
of good times too. I want to 
thank everyone who has helped 
along the way: Jim, Greg, Dr. 
Shad, and especially Krissy 
and Brett. I couldn't have done 
it without you. Take care eve- 
ryone, and good luck. 



D 



ave Bright 

Psychology 
Chestertown, Maryland 



Lots of memories with Jean- 
ine. Rowing. Peer advising. My 
internships at Camp Fairlee 
and the mental hospital. Spe- 
cial friends. Swim team. San- 
ta for a day. SCUBA diving. 
Lifting everyday with the gang. 
Room to room '90. WC par- 
ties. Getting lost in Baltimore. 
Luaus. Washington Ball. Or- 
ganic Chemistry from hell. 5 
years in the Rescue Squad. 
Paint gun wars. Dancing. 
Many other fond memories. 
Mom & Dad — thanks for 
making it possible! Off to Med 
School . . . 




l 


^1 aMPki ^^ 




"If ^^^yBDn 





96 SENIORS 




L 



ara T. Buchanan 

Business Management 
Dunkirk, Maryland 



D, 



avid Brightman 

History 

Merion Station, Pennsylvania 

Life comes down to a few 
special moments. This 
could be one of them. 




SENIORS 97 



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J 



98 SENIORS 



K 



.aren F. Brady 

Biology 
Chalfont, Pennsylvania 

"About time you real- 
ized. You are a speci- 
ality, There is no one 
like you. Spend your life 
worrying, 'bout what 
you could have been, 
Can't you like being 



you 



?" 



To my friends — 

Thanks for making 
these four of the best 
years of my life. 
To my family — 

Thanks for all of your 
love and support. I never 
could have made it this 
far without you! 



iVlargaret Mary 
Doyle 

Sociology 
Cockeysville, Maryland 

Behind every success in 
life lies an inspiration. I 
would like to take this op- 
portunity to thank that in- 
spiration — my family. 
The time has come for me 
to put your love and guid- 
ance to use in my own spe- 
cial way. I have the chance 
to develop into the type of 
inspiration that you have 
been. Thank you for the 
confidence, strength, and 
most of all, for the friend- 
ship that you have por- 
trayed throughout my life. 



iVristin L. 
Hilgartner 

History 
Baltimore, Maryland 

"Sail on silver girl. 
Sail on by 

Your time has come to 
shine. 

All your dreams are on 
their way. 

See how they shine. 
If you need a friend 
Tm sailing right behind 
Like a bridge over trou- 
bled water 
I will ease your mind." 

Deb and Erin — Thanks 
for being great friends and 
roommates. Mom, Dad. 
Rick, and Maura — 
Thank you for your sup- 
port, friendship, lore, and 
confidence in me. 



SENIORS 99 



shannon E. Cupka rvebecca Lynn Smith Jennifer Mowll 

Psychology Biology Chemistry 



Kendall Park, New Jersey 



'You mean that's it?!?" 



Richmond, Virginia 

"You only live once so you 
might as well have fun." 



Rehoboth Beach, DE 

"These are the times to 
remember." 



K 




athy Brewster 

Biology 
Edgewood, Maryland 



"People are like stained glass win- 
dows, they sparkle and shine when the 
sun is out, but when darkness sets in, 
their beauty is revealed only if there 
is a light within." — Elizabeth Ku- 
bler-Ross 



im Millender 

Political Science 
Hampstead, Maryland 



There is a destiny that 

makes us sisters 

None goes her way alone: 

All that we send into the 

lives of others. 

Comes back into our own. 



100 SENIORS 



A SORORITY 

If it's really anything at all 
A sorority is not entirely 

a flower 

national conventions 

monogrammed rings 

worn-out songs 

By-laws 

Membership Standards 

or 

a golden pin. 
And it is not entirely 

an institution 

a creed 

a legacy 

an obliation 

or 

a way of life. 
If you're going to insist that it is something 
A sorority is only 

moving in for the first time and slowly learning all the beautiful 

people have fat legs and use mouthwash and wear last year's coats. 
Long, tired eternities of black coffee and exams snacks 

when you still can't remember the Renaissance architects 

or the mossy taproot system, 

borrowing a skirt from Shannon and a blouse from Jen 

and shoes from Rebecca and a scarf from Kim 

and a coat from Kathy and passing it all off as your own, 

sitting on the back steps and listening with all your helplessness 

because 

she's lost and she's lonely and it seems the whole world just fell 

into ugly little pieces. 
And it's 

coming in very late one night and closing the door to tell someone 

who's seen you through the hardest years of your life that you're happ) now . 

and you're getting married. 
And a sorority is, I suppose, a kind of evaluation, 
You grow up inside these elegant halls 

And perhaps you do learn more of this grizzly, ungrateful circus 
we call life. 

Then if you had lived it somewhere else. 
You learn that no matter where you came from, or who took you there, 

you've still got to find that one small acre that belongs to you, 

by yourself. 
You learn to wait because change is slow and change isn't always right. 
You learn that there's a lot left to believe in 

and a whole lot more to hope for. 
You learn that love has never been easy and that it's a long time coming. 
And if you're smart, or very lucky, you learn that no matter how big 

or how messy the world becomes, what is precious and what is permanent 

is always the same. 
And in the very end, 
A sorority can only be 

a better way 

to stumble 

down the back steps 

and out the front door. 



SENIORS 101 





John Buckey 

English 
Richmond, Virginia 

/ had another dream about the li- 
ons at the door 

They weren't half as frightening as 
they were before 

But I've been thinking about eter- 
nity 

Some kind of ecstasy got a hold on 
me. 

Out among the firs where it smells 
so sweet 

Or down in the valley where the riv- 
er used to be 

I've got my mind on eternity 
Some kind of ecstasy got a hold on 
me. 

Freighters on the night on the sur- 
face of the bay 

One of these days we're going to 
sail away 
Sail into eternity 

Some kind of ecstasy got a hold on 
me 

And I'm wondering where the lions 
are. 

— Bruce Cockburn 

/\ndrea Butchart 

English, Art 
Ruxton, Maryland 

"There is no solution because 
there is no problem." 

— Marcel Duchamp 
"... Are done with it. What is 
there to discuss?/ There's noth- 
ing left for us to say of us." 

— Howard Nemerov 



102 SENIORS 




A 



my Ruth Caddie 

Humanities/French 
Keyport, New Jersey 

female 
there is an amazon in us. 
she is the secret we do not 
have to learn, 
the strength that opens us 
beyond ourselves, 
birth is our birthright, 
we smile our mysterious smile. 
— Lucille Clifton 

Si nous resistons a nos 
passions, c'est plus par 
leur faiblesse que par 
not re force. 

— La Rochefoucauld 



Lyarryl Calloway 

History/Education 
Chesterlown, Maryland 

Great is thy faithfulness. 

The Lord is good to those who wait 

for him, 

to the soul that seeks him. 
It is good for a man that he bear 
the yoke in his youth . . . 
Let him give his cheek to the smit- 
er, 

and be filled with insults. 
For the Lord will not cast off for- 
ever. 

But, though he cause grief, he will 
have compassion 

according to the abundance of 
his steadfast love. 

LAMENTATIONS 3: 23-32 




SENIORS 103 




R 



achel Carter 

International Relations 
Centreville, Maryland 



"It's raining hard 

And you'll always love me 

Won't you? 
Yes. 
. . . and the rain won't make 

any difference? 
No. 
That's good, because I'm 

afraid of the rain. 

— E. Hemingway 

Thanks Mom and Dad for your 
patience and understanding. 



K 



asey Carroll 

Biology 
Sarasota, Florida 



Many people have come and gone 
over the past four years, the most 
valuable ones are those who 
stayed. They stayed through my 
heartaches, sorrows, pains, joys, 
excitements, and successes. 
Thanks everyone who touched my 
life and changed me: my ZTA sis- 
ters (especially Miriam and Ter- 
esa), Kim, Dennis, Glenn, and eve- 
ryone else. Special thanks to the 
people who love me even at my 
worst: Mom, Dad, Bob, Frank, 
Meaghan — ESPECIALLY Brian 




104 SENIORS 



K 



imberly Coburn 

History 
Dallas, Texas 



"That's all I'd do all day. I'd 
just be the catcher in the rye and 
all. I know it's crazy, but that's 
the only thing I'd really like to 
be. I now it's crazy. " 

— J.D. Salinger The Catcher in 

the Rye 
"Christina, bring me the axe!" 

— from the motion picture 

Mommie Dearest 
A toast . . . to my Dad, Marsha, 
and Donn who have encouraged 
and humored me throughout the 
years; and to my mom who 
moved to Richmond just so I 
could be closer to home!; to all 
my pals at the I-house; and to 
my favorite "idiot" — just for 
being an "idiot"!?! 



ennifer Clarke 

Art 
Baltimore, Maryland 




SENIORS 105 






C 



atherine E. Cole 

Humanities 
Chappaqua, New York 




A 



nastasia E. Vendelis 

Psychology 
Timonium, Maryland 




T 



racy Greenawalt 

Business 
Hunt Valley, Maryland 



106 SENIORS 




J oan Colton 

Sociology 
Baltimore, Maryland 

"Nothing in life is exactly as 
we choose it to be. No matter 
how awful life can seem, it's 
always possible that some- 
thing wonderful might be just 
around the corner." 

— Danielle Steele 



M 



ichael Robert Turner 

New York, New York 



c 



harles Mark Connors 

Sweet Briar, Virginia 




SENIORS 107 



^ 19*8 •1988 

9 IRELAND 




WT RISHFRI 
G I 9 6 8 

k IRELA 



[|I3> 



M 



att Conaty 

English 
Wilmington, Delaware 



M 



ary Elizabeth Crandall 

Art 
Attleboro, Massachusetts 



"The secret of life is enjoying the 

passing of time. " J.T. 

I've had two of my best years here 

at W.C. I want to say thank you 

to all my close friends and wish 

them all the best of luck in their 

future. 




ulie "Jules" Greene 
Economics 
Salisbury, Maryland 



G 



Scores Coss: 5 Jules: 4 

Assists by: Mom, Dad, Sal, Lynn, Michelle, 

Sieph, Coss, Fais, India, 

heh, check the student directory. 
"A friend is a gift you give yourself." 

Robert Louis Stevenson 
"I must have been awfully selfish." 

Julie E. Greene 




regory G. Coss 

English 
Bethesda, Maryland 



All I ask out of life is happiness. A 
nice job writing sports for a news- 
paper, good friends at my work, and 
a wife that doesn't have a moustache 



or hair on her back. Also, her name 
can't be Bertha and she can't shave 
sheep for a living. {Eric "The Bull" 
Forste gave me this advice.) Thanks 
to the Elm staff, The Cows, Fats. Sal, 
Beattie, Tenbo, Lynnbo, Jules. Iko, 
Wally and others for making my last 
semester interesting. Til never forget 
this place, no matter how hard I try! 



SENIORS 109 



J eff Daly 

English 
Denton, Maryland 

"Uh . . . so this is it huh? . . . uh 
. . . graduation . . . yeah, well, 
could I have an extension?" 





JZydna Diefenderfer 

Mathematics 
Preston, Maryland 

"The will to win is not near- 
ly as important as the will 
to prepare to win. " — Bobby 
Knight 



110 SENIORS 



J ustine De Santis 

English 
Piscataway, New Jersey 

"My twain of thought is 
loosely bound 

I guess it's time to mark this 
down 

Be good and you will be 
lonesome 

Be lonesome and you will be 
free 

Live a lie and you will live 
to regret it 

That's what living is to me. " 
— Jimmy Buffett 




Dear Flicker, 

To my favorite little devil 

Love Mom 
P.S. Paybacks are hell. 




SENIORS 111 



M 



iriam Brigitte Dittmann 

International Studies 
Arnold, Maryland 




Mom and Dad — you never once 
left my side in the worst of times, 
and the best of times you always 
shared with me. I love you both 
and thank you for making this 
dream come true. To my closest 
friends and my best friend (C. C.S.) 
don't lost touch and thanks for all 
the crazy adventures. 

"And the Sea, let 

it be full with tomorrow. " 



JVathleen Feeney 

History 
Pasadena, Maryland 



112 SENIORS 



J ulianne Lynn Dolde 

Psychology 
Chesapeake City, Maryland 

In this world it is not what we 
take up, but what we give up, 
that makes us rich. 

— Henry Ward Beecher 





'. Shanley Driscoll 

Drama/English 
Monkton, Maryland 

Light the pickle 



SENIORS 113 




c 



ynthia J. Bucci 

Biology 
Fallston, Maryland 




X^amela S. Feeney 

English 
Crofton, Maryland 

She was the single artificer of the 
world 

In which she sang. And when she 
sang, the sea, 

Whatever self it had, became the 
self 

That was her song, for she was the 
maker. Then we. 

As we beheld her striding there 
alone. 

Knew that there never was a world 
for her 

Except the one she sang and, sing- 
ing, made. 

— Wallace Stevens 

I can't complain, 

But sometimes I still do. 

Life's been good to me so far! 

— Joe Walsh 



ames T R. Finlay II 

English 
Westford, Massachusetts 



114 SENIORS 




c 



ynthia H. Fields-Belanger 

Humanities 
Chestertown, Maryland 



1129 
Tell all the truth but tell it slant — 
Success in Circuit lies 
Too bright for our infirm Delight 
The Truth's superb surprise 
As Lightening to the Children eased 
With explanation kind 
The Truth must dazzle gradually 
Or ever man be blind — 

Emily Dickinson 



Twit twit twit 

Jug jug jug jug jug jug 

Datta. 

Shantih shantih shantih 



J enifer Grindle 

History/English 
Church Creek, Maryland 

EDUCATION — That which dis- 
closes to the wise and disguises from 
the foolish their laclc of under- 
standing. 

ERUDITION — Dust shaken out 
of a book into an empty skull. 
ACHIEVEMENT — The death of 
endeavor and the birth of disgust. 
— Ambrose Bierce, The Devil's 
Dictionary 




SENIORS 115 




B 



JUric A. Forste 

Humanities 
Arnold, Maryland 

"Can I have another piece of choco- 
late cake?" 

— Crowded House 
I can't wait to move on, but I wouldn't 
be ready without Mom, Dad, and Pete 
— / love you, family. Great thanks 
to: Bruce, Fats, Josh, Coss, Cardinal 
C, ZTA babies, Wildman Bates, Dra- 
ma freaks, Andrew, Profs. Anderson, 
Newell, Brien and Scholz, A.V., Ben- 
edictine, Susan, all the Sacred Cow 
fans, and God. 
"Thanks for the memories!" 

— Bob Hope 



rooke L. Frank 

History/Political Science 
Moorestown, New Jersey 



Keep the peanut butter away from 
John! Twin Peaks. That's such a 
decent moose! Super Bass-o-mat- 
ic. "There is no job." Kitty-ups. 
"Tm a veg Danny." The Land 
Rover (when not on fire). MIA-RA. 
Bed-head and Crash. Mr. Data. 
The Busch hat. Fate protects fools, 
little children, and ships named 
Enterprise. North Hatley. "Gen- 
tlemen, we must protect our pho- 
ney baloney jobs. " Nemo est supra 
leges. Dr. Stangelove. Frank's your 
last name?! Fletch. 




116 SENIORS 




B 



rian Gimelson 

Business/Art History 
Doyleslown, Pennsylvania 



"It's the little things in lije that mal<e the hig 
things so big." 

— Brian Gimelson 
"Waiter's are great things . . . you ask them for 
what you want, and then they bring it to you." 

— Dudley Moore as Arthur 
"The country has charms only for those who are 
not obliged to stay here . . . This war of daggers 
has done me a great deal of harm, and I have 
suffered intensely from it. But it was also a stim- 
ulus for me." 

— Edouard Manet 
"I don't want any cheese, just let me out of this 
trap." 

— Bernard Gimelson 
"Give me the bat, I'm not gonna hurt ya . . . I'm 
just gonna bash your brains in." — Jack Ni- 
cholson 

To my family, friends. Kappa Alpha Order, 
fellow members ofSGA, WacHappenings Staff, 
and members of the International House. I bid 
you all a fond farewell and I offer you thanks. 
Carpe Diem. 



J ennifer C. Griffin 

History 
Reisterstown, Maryland 




SENIORS 117 



ohn Goebel 

Art 
Washington, D.C. 





/ 



Mil. 




>■ 



B 



ruce Hamilton 

English 
Port Republic, Maryland 



"Given the existence as uttered 
forth in the public works of 
Puncher and Wattmann of a per- 
sonal God quaquaquaqua with 
white beard quaquaquaqua out- 
side time without extension who 
from the heights of divine apathia 
divine athambia divine aphasia 
loves us dearly with some excep- 
tions for reasons unknown. " 



118 SENIORS 




w 



illiam Halagarda 

Malhemalics 
Holbrook, New York 



"Say goodbye to the oldies but 
goodies, cause the good old days 
weren't always good and tomor- 
row ain't as bad as it seems." 
Class of 92, "Keep the faith." 




ennifer Golden 

English 
Princeton, New Jersey 



SENIORS 119 




J oseph Hamilton 

Humanities 
Essex, Maryland 

"Freedom would become the 
environment of an organism 
which is no longer capable of 
adapting to the competitive 
performances required for 
wellbeing under domination, 
no longer capable of tolerating 
the aggressiveness, brutality, 
and ugliness of the established 
way of life." 

— Herbert Marcuse 
"Come to the orchard in 
Spring. 

There is light and wine, and 
sweethearts in the pomegran- 
ate flowers. 

If you do not come, these do 
not matter. 

If you do come, these do not 
matter." 

— Rumi 

i 

ohn P. Harty III - 

Sociology I 

Garden City, New York I 



Thanks to all my friends and fam- 
ily. 

Love, 
J.P. 



120 SENIORS 




v^laudia Heimbach 

Humanities 
Upper Grandview, New York 



J • Patrick Hanifee 

Business 
Millington, Maryland 

"Discoveries are often made by 
not following instructions, by 
going off the main road, by try- 
ing the untried." 

— Frank Tyler 

Good luck everyone else and see 
ya! 




SENIORS 1:1 




Stephanie Janel Hess 

Drama 
Lancaster, Pennsylvania 

"Curiouser and curiouser!" 

Alice's Adventures in Won- 
derland 

Lewis Carroll 



T 



amy B. Hickman 

Biology 
Chestertown, Maryland 



Suppose an artist painted an 
ideally beautiful man, so that 
his portrait should lack nothing 
that could contribute to its per- 
fection. Were he then unable to 
prove that any such man could 
exist, would that make him any 
less of an artist? 

— Plato, "The Republic" 




122 SENIORS 




G 



regory Hickman 

Business Management/French 
Hunlingon, Maryland 

In 1788, Mozart wrote to his 
father that the flute is "an 
instrument that I cannot 
bear." The same "genius" 
penned the eloquent phrase, 
"I write music as a sow pid- 
dles." 

My musical experience at 
WC can be summed up quite 
nicely as follows: 

I occasionally play 
works by contemporary 
composers and for two 
reasons. First to dis- 
courage the composer 
from writing and sec- 
ondly to remind myself 
how much I appreciate 
Beethoven. 

— Jascha Heifetz 



J ason Imber 

Drama 
New York. New York 

"It's either real or it's a 
dream 

there's nothing that is in be- 
tween." 

— ELO 



SENIORS 123 




R 



ose Jarboe 

Psychology 
Pasadena, Maryland 



Every person can write at least one book but. 

after 4 years at WC, I could write the outline 

for an anthology. 

Book 1: Queen Annes Chapter 1: The Gang 

Chapter 2: The Pyrotechnic Chapter 3: 
The Thief 

Book 2: Worcester Chapter I: Living with Boys 
Chapter 2: Blonde Cap Chapter 3: In- 
ternational Affairs 
Chapter 4: Stupidity 

Book 3: Worcester continued Chapter 1: Cajun 
Cookin' 

Chapter 2: Bittersweet Chapter 3: Rock 
Bottom 

Book 4: Cardinal Chapter I: .4 New Light 

Chapter 2: Adjustment Chapter 3: Per- 
fect Timing Epilogue: Spanning the 
Globe. Tim, Luke. Christian. Josh. Fred 
Astaire, Thanks for the memories!! 



J ames Louis Jenkins, Jr. 

History 
Richmond, Virginia 

"Be on your guard; do not let your 
minds be captured by hollow and 
delusive speculations, based on 
traditions of man-made teaching 
and centered on the elemental 
spirits of the universe and not on 
Christ." 

— Colossians 2:8 
"To be a Virginian, either by birth, 
adoption, or even on one's moth- 
er's side, is an introduction into 
any state in the union, a passport 
to any foreign country, and a ben- 
ediction from the Almighty God." 
— Anonymous 




124 SENIORS 



D 



eborah Johnson 

Biology 
Washington D.C. 



/ am me. 

And you are you. 

As you can see; 

But when you do 

The things that you can do. 

You will find the Way, 

And the Way will follow 

you. 

— Tao of Pooh 





lA^aren Marie Johnston 

English 
Millington, Maryland 

My advice to others is to make the 
best out of what you have. My four 
years at WC have been hard, but I 
wouldn't trade them for anything. I 
have learned a lot, have a lot of 
friends, and I even have a second 
home in the library. All of the ladies 
in there are my "library moms." I 
have had so much fun with them and 
the maintenance guys. They call me 
"the little redhead in the library" or 
"Trouble." Fm not trouble, but I like 
to have fun so I make the best out 
of situations. I have grown up here 
and I am going to miss it. 



SENIORS 125 




oan Koo 

International Studies 
Seoul, Korea 




JT^atricia Karnes 

Biology 
Marydel, Maryland 

The sun strokes the rippling 
water with such a gentle touch, 
Carefully sending it along, as 
the gentle breeze 

eagerly pushes it to some 
unknown destiny. 
As I sit, I am also touched by 
these elements, 

caressed and moved. 
To a time that once was, now 
moving to what will be. 
There will always be a grad- 
u '! movement to somewhere 
un, 'lown. 

But ■ will always remember 
where f have been! 




126 SENIORS 




The Kelly Mafia 



John E. Kelly 

Business Management 
Fairfax, Virginia 

My years at Washington College have left 
me innumerable friendships with students, 
faculty and administrators which I will al- 
ways remember. The construction that has 
been so prevalent during the last four years 
has changed the physical appearance of 
Washington College, but the social at- 
mosphere has remained wholly intact. The 
social aspect of Washington College will 
continue to remain the best asset for re- 
cruiting new students. Additionally, I 
would like to thank Dean Mclntire and 
Dean Maxcy for all their help and caring 
during my college experience. I am now 
ready to assume the alumnus role of pro- 
moting and supporting this fine institution 
on Maryland's quaint Eastern Shore. I will 
truly miss Washington College. 



K.evin P. Kelly 

Political Science/History 
Baltimore, Maryland 

J.K. — great "ruling" with you, 
bro! Brooke, you are my best 
friend and advisor . . . as far as 
you know. Flip — You are decent 
Cap'n. To Pingry — Thanks, from 
one island of poverty to another. 
To Glenn — yes, you did make it. 
To the guys in Dorchester — 
Thanks for the memories. To 
Charlie, Flea, Gumby and Pokey, 
and the JVC soccer team — / had 
a great time. Special thanks to 
Dean Maxcy, Dean Mclntire, and 
Doc Ed for their confidence in me. 
To Deanna - just because. 



SENIORS i: 



R 



aphael Koster 

English/Spanish 
Port-au-Prince, Haiti 

My life at college: 
"Brilliant!" 

"It was terrible!" 
"Well, it was good." 

"Well, it was very bad." 
"Well, it was average." 

"It was in the middle there. " 
"It wasn't that great." 

"I kind a liked it." 
"It was terrible." 

"I loved it!" 
"Get 'em off!" 

"More!!" 
— The two old guys in the 
balcony 

(from Jim Henson's Mup- 
pet Show Cast Album) 





D 



eborah Jan Kulich 

Art 
Kinderhook, New York 

The world is not entirely 
made of money — more 
people need to realize that. 
{And who decided to put my 
nickname as "Debbie" in the 
JVC directory?) 



128 SENIORS 

V 




c 



athy Janel Lease 

Political Science and Sociology 
Frederick, Maryland 



. . . I'm doing what I should have 
done years ago, which is finding out 
who I am and what I want. I want 
to have a choice. And when I make 
decisions through choice, not duty, 
it has to be better for me and for the 
people who love me and the people 
I love. 

— Louise Fletcher 



B 



enjamin D. Lamanna 

International Studies 
Camillus, New York 




SENIORS 129 




H 



al McBee 

Business 
Kent Island, Maryland 



i^tefanie L. Lee 

Business Management 
Gaithersburg, Maryland 

/ have been at Washington College 
for four years, and the most won- 
derful thing that ever happened to 
me is an extraordinary guy named 
Orrin E. Schmidt who entered my 
life in 1988. You and I have been 
through good and bad times, sad 
and happy times, but most of all 
we shared these times together. I 
dedicate this quotation to you my 
darling. I will always love you. 
Love, 
Stefanie Schmidt 




130 SENIORS 



L 



aura McClellan 

Business 
Arnold, Maryland 





L 



ynn Massicot 

Psychology 
Owings Mills, Maryland 



Some people strengthen the soci- 
ety just by being the kind of people 
they are. 

— John W. Gardner 
To my friends — Deb, Tim, Mich- 
elle, Steph, Sally, Jules, Billy, 
Jase, Jen, Rose, Fatman, Greg, Ed, 
Mike — You're the best. 



SENIORS 131 




Oally McGee 

Humanities 
Eldersburg, Maryland 

My appreciation goes out to the 
following: 

Julie, Michelle, Lynn, and 
Steph for being "en-pasante" 
roommates. 

Fatty and Ari for re-naming 
me. 

Cossie and the Cows for just 
being there. 

Melissa and the Plumes for 
music and laughter. 

Mom and Dad for birth and 
tuition. 

Tom, Maria, Troy, Greg, Gim- 
bo, Ciaran, Pink Floyd, John, 
Mike, Mar, Karyn, Amy, Car- 
dinal A and B, Sting, Tim and 
Billy . . . 

You guys are the best! Thanks 
for everything! 



eoffrey Mason Nelson 

Bethesda, Maryland 



It's better to be alive and unknown, 
than a dead hero. 

Thanks Mom for all your help. Dad, 
although you can't be here, don't worry, 
I graduated. 



132 SENIORS 



i' 






^>^ ^tsa 


l^y N 




m 





K 



L 



eslie W. Newcomb 

Business 
Beachwood, New Jersey 



"And if you look across the ocean 
you will see a shining light and I 
know tomorrow everything will be 
alright." 



aria Melissa Moffett 

Sociology 

Dover, Delaware 



Animals are such 

agreeable friends; 

they ask no ques- 
tions, 
pass no criticisms. 

— Mary Ann Cross 



Life is like an on- 
ion; 

you peel off one 
layer 

at a time, and 

sometimes you 
weep. 

— Carl Sandburg 



Those who make their dress a principle 
part of themselves, will, in general, become 
of no more value than their dress. 

— William Hazlitt 
Thanks Mom and Dad! 
Love, Karla 





T 



racy Peel 

Psychology 
South Africa 



To all my American friends: thank 
you for making my stay in your won- 
derful country one of the best ex- 
periences of my life! Hopefully we'll 
all soon be together bundo-bashing 
in sunny South Africa. 



G 



ilbert McMahon Orser 

English 
San Francisco, California 

"In a criminal world the on- 
ly crime is getting caught." 
— Unknown 




134 SENIORS 




V 



T 



roy Petenbrink 

Political Science 
Old Town, Maryland 



"Any society which does not insist 
upon respect for all life must nec- 
essarily decay." 

— Albert Einstein 



anessa A. Post 

Spanish 
Annapolis, Maryland 



"Las ondas tienen vaga armonia; 
las violetas, suave olor; brumas de 
plata, la noche fria; 

luz y ore, el dia; 

yo, algo mejor: 

yo tengo Amor." 

— Becuer 




SENIORS 135 



Oteve Pursley 
Business 
Baldwin, Maryland 

Life is made pleasurable due to 
the perpetual existence of friend- 
ship, sports, and the ability to learn. 
As a student you have to create an 
equilibrium between all three. When 
you fail to contribute in life you fail 
to answer why we were put on this 
earth. This is the essence of Wash- 
ington College. You contribute, you 
learn, you make mistakes, but you 
show a resilience. I would like to 
thank my friends, professors, 
coaches, and most of all my family 
for giving me the confidence to 
bounce back all the times I fell 
down. 




n 













JVaren Reck 

International Studies 
Westminster, Maryland 



136 SENIORS 




JVerri Anne Reed 

Art 
Baltimore, Maryland 

/ feel I owe a special thanks to a 
few very special people who made 
my years at WC possible and 
memorable. To my mother and my 
grandparents: 

Words cannot express how ex- 
tremely grateful I am and always 
will be!! 

Washington college has given me 
the chance to take advantage of an 
excellent education and also has 
given me the opportunity to meet 
a truly wonderful friend — Thanks 
Steven! 

"I carry your heart with me." 
M. Hedges 



V licker Reese 

English 
Mercersburg, Pennsylvania 

Mom and Dad — You gave 
me the initial push and re- 
leased me to drift down my 
own river, at a current of my 
own choice, in a raft built by 
my own hands, with a des- 
tination concocted by my 
own dreams. Thanks for the 
push. I love you. 

Friends — just like the 
desks at school. Til never be 
the same without you. In a 
few years, we should all 
meet at Andy's . . . Til wait 
outside. 




s ^ 



I 



SENIORS 137 




R 



achael Rice 

English 
Bel Air, Maryland 



Mom and Dad — Congratulations! 
Four down, none to go! 
A — thanks for three wonderful years. 
Mir — you filled with laughter a space 
left empty three years ago. 
Afrikaner — we went through a lot of 
headache and heartache; I hope it was 
worth it to you, too. 
My friends in Dorchester — you have 
taught me the art of wasting time ef- 
fectively. 

To the worst sorority on campus — be 
good — / will miss you! 



J effrey W. Rexford 

History 
Westport, Connecticut 

"Good bye Easy Street" — - 
Jerry Jeff Walker "May the 
good Lord take a liken to ya 
and may all your troubles be 
little ones." — Virgil Singer 




138 SENIORS 



Uavid T. Riddiford, Jr. 

English 
Andover, Massachusetts 

"Inspiration Moves Me Brightly" G.D. 

Bates, Harty, Bucky, V, J 

and all my friends: 

O' that these were 

Wonderful Years, how I 

Know I'll miss them 

and all of you: 

"We reach for destinies beyond 

What we have come to know. " A. Walker 

Mom and Dad, your support and kind- 
ness have brought me a long way, 
I Love you both, thanks. 

I'm smiling, boy am I SMILING!! 





D 



eidre Riegel 

Drama 
Birdsboro, Pennsylvania 



AS DECREED BY THE CELESTIAL HIERACHY II £ 

SHALL WALK IN SILENCE CLAD IN SUITS OF 

HERMETIC INVISIBILITY. STAR THIEF ASCENDANTS 

OF 

THE SPANGLED STAIRCASE. WE HOLD .\0 SECRET TO 

RANSOM .AND BUILD NO TOWERS WE WE.4R SCARS 

ON OUR SOULS LIKE .MEDALS P.4G.4N FALLIBLE d 

BE.-iUTIFUL THE ALL)' BEHIND OUR EYES AIDS d 

EVADES THE .METAPHYSICAL GY.MN.ASTICS OF THE 

SHAKESPEARE .MONKEYS STAR STUDDED 
BULLETPROOF H.ALOS TIPPED .AT R.AKISH .ANGLES 

NIMBUS WARRIORS RIDI.XG STEEL DR.AGO.\S 

TWILITES FLICKERING MERCEN.ARIES DR.APED IN 

JEWELS & .AUTOM.ATIC POETRY SE.ARCH & DESTROY 

NAPALM FOR THE INFERNAL .M.ACHINES OF THE 

TYRANNOS.AURUS LOGIC 
TOMORROW BELONGS TO THE LOVE RE.ACTION" 
— ZODIAC Mindwarp & The Love Reaction 



SENIORS 139 




K 



athleen M. Robbins 

English 
Greenwich, Connecticut 




M 



aryClaire Curran Russell 
Biology 
Baltimore, Maryland 




Sydney C. Ashley 

Sociology 
Centreville, Maryland 



ennifer K. Sponseller 

Sociology 
Frederick, Maryland 



140 SENIORS 



H 



eather Ann Scholtz 

Chemistry 
Brick, New Jersey 



"Nothing contributes so much to 
tranquilize the mind as a steady 
purpose — a point on which the 
soul may fix its intellectual eye. " 
— Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley 





Jon Seal 

History 
Owings Mills, Maryland 

To my good friends: these 
past four years which we 
have spent together have 
been very special; the mem- 
ories which we have made 
and shared will not be for- 
gotten. I love you guys! 



SENIORS 141 



L 




M 



atthew B. Shields 

Art/English 
Sterling, Virginia 

"Taraxacum Officinale" 



c 



hristopher Cooley 
Seymour 

American Studies 
West Hartford, Connecticut 

Thank you Mom, Dave, Whit, Bob, 
Andrew and Alex for all the support 
over the years. 

Good luck to my friends who I have 
encountered at WC — keep in touch. 
Miriam — thanks for putting up 
with me. 

I miss vou Dad! 




14; SENIORS 



1 heresa Sganga 

Mathematics 
Severna Park, Maryland 

We enter Washington College, young 
and naive, that miracle occurs and 
somehow, most of us walk out with 
diplomas in our hands ready to tackle 
the next obstacle. Many Special 
Thanks must be given to those who 
helped me make that miracle occur: 
My family, friends, the Athletic De- 
partment at WC and even Dr. Briggs. 
I thank you all for being patient and 
supportive, no matter how disillu- 
sioned I became. 




' TWEM A 

MIRACLE 
OCCURS , 



'5f5 I'D 
2r W 



A^5 




^AOCE EXf uic\T HtCE iri Sft? Two.' 




SENIORS N 




H 



eather Skidmore 

Sociology 
Houston, Texas 



M 



ary Elizabeth Speer 

German 
Gainesville, Florida 

"Mary, you really should let your hair 
down." — Gimbo 

"Um Guts zu tun, braucht's keiner 
Uberlegung. " 

— Goethe, Iphigenie auf Tauris 
"Ein unn'utz Leben ist ein fruher 
Tod" 

— Goethe, Iphigenie auf Tauris 
"Greift nur hinein ins voile Men- 
schenleben! 

Ein jeder lebt's, nicht vu vielen ist's 

bekannt, 

Und wo ihr's packt, da ist's inter- 

essant." 

- Goethe, Faust, Prologue 
Slow and steady wins the race. — 
Aesop, The Hare and the Tortoise 
To everyone in International House, 
I think y'all are the best . . . truly. 

' Mary 




144 SENIORS 



c 



ynthia Slaby 

Business 
Crofton, Maryland 



Freshman: "Wall faces make good 

conversation." 
Sophomore: "They're coming to 

take me away! He He Ho Ho . . . 

Junior: "Where am I and how did 
I get here?" 

Senior: "/ spent four years pros- 
trate to the higher mind. Got my 
paper and I was free." 

"Thank you for life's discovery." 





D 



avid Snyder 

English 
Baltimore, Maryland 

Amy; you have always 
been therefor me. I hope 
Fve been half as good a 
brother to you . . . 

Mom; you have given me 
so much. What else can 
I say? I love you both so 
much. 

To my friends; you have 
taught me more than 
you can ever know. I will 
remember these years 
forever; thank you all. 

"Life is a series of hellos 
and goodbyes. I'm 
afraid it's time for 
goodbye again." — Bil- 
ly Joel 



c 



arey Ann Smith 

English/Drama 
Linwood, New Jersey 



"Nothing to be done" 

Waiting for Godot 








Stephanie Tennyson 

International Studies 
Fredericksburg, Virginia 



"There is only one success — to be 
able to spend your life in your own 
way." — Christopher Morley 

I would like to thank my family (es- 
pecially my mother), my friends and 
professors for allowing me to do so. 
I would also like to thank them for 
their love, encouragement and sup- 
port during these past years. You all 
are the best! WC — it's been great! 



146 SENIORS 








anviere Thuman 
English 
Grasonville, Maryland 



J udy Summers 

English 
Manassas, Virginia 

"And now here is my secret, a 
very simple secret: It is only with 
the heart that one can see right- 
ly; what is essential is invisible 
to the eye." 

Antoine De Saint-Exupery 
The Little Prince 




SENIORS 147 




K 



aren A. Stritehoff 

Psychology 
Greenwich, Connecticut 



A 



my Usilton 

Psychology 
Worton, Maryland 



"Such a fellowship of good knights 
shall never be together in no com- 
pany." 

— Le Morte d' Arthur 
"True happiness 

Consists not in the multitude of 
friends, 
But in the worth and choice." 

— Ben Johnson 




148 SENIORS 



G 



lenn M. Warner 

American Studies 
Vestal, New York 



W.C. was a great place to go to 
college. I'll never forget my true 
friends, whether they live in New 
Jersey, Mexico, or anywhere else. 

"Do not follow where 
The path may lead. 
Go instead, where there is no 
path 

And leave a trail" 

Anonymous 




K 




ris Wallenberg 

Biology 
Chestertown, Maryland 

"In Germany they first 
came for the Communists, 
and I didn't speak up be- 
cause I wasn't a Communist. 
Then they came for the Jews, 
and I didn't speak up be- 
cause I wasn't a Jew. Then 
they came for the trade un- 
ionists, and I didn't speak up 
because I wasn't a trade un- 
ionist. Then they came for 
the Catholics, and I didn't 
speak up because I was a 
Protestant. Then they came 
for me — and by that time 
no on was left to speak up." 



SENIORS 149 




c 



hristine Webb 

Psychology 
Elkton, Maryland 



'•LIVE LONG AND PROS- 
PER" 



»^usan Leah Wiater 

History 
Rochester, New York 

"One day at a time — this is 
enough. Do not look back and 
grieve over the past, for it is 
gone; and do not be troubled 
about the future, for it has not 
yet come. Live in the present, 
and make it so beautiful that 
it will be worth remembering. " 
— Ida Scott Taylor 




150 SENIORS 



M 



onica Wilen 
Sociology 
Mexico City, Mexico 





/\nne Woodrum 

English 
Roanoke, Virginia 

"When you discard arrogance, 
complexity, and a few other things 
that get in the way, sooner or later 
you will discover that simple, 
childlike, and mysterious secret 
known to those of the Uncarved 
Block: Life is Fun." 

— Benjamin Hoff 
The Too of Pooh 



SENIORS 151 




152 ACTIVITIES 



CTIVITIE 



5 
U 

O 




Aerobics Club: Tracy Greenawalt, Heather Coursey, Heather Feezer, Diana Holton, Ashley 
Holladay, Anastasia Vendelis, Samantha Clements, Lisa Pruett 







Campus Christian Fellowship: Jim Siemen, Rose Jarboe, Dawn Jarboe. Susan VV'aclverbath, Jennifer 
Rupperl. Tim Stoltzfus, Karyn lacangelo, Lynn Massicot, Niurka Goenaga 



154 ACTIVITIES 




CIA: David George, Glenn Warner. John Buckey, Tammie Michener, Julie Greene, Teri Turmel, 
Sally McGee 




Dale Adams Heritage Exchange: Salwa Amer, Tia Arnold, Tina Arnold, Bridgette Avant. Charles 
Bucknor, Lisa Castro, Charles Cummings, Steve Dadzie, Jerry Davis, India Henson, Dawn 
Israel, Zylia Knowlin, Corey Needam. Tamela Pinkney, Tammie Silva. Brenda Stanley, John 
Winchester, Jessica Aspiazu, Nora Sullivan, Nicole Bachinsky, Bunny Yeh, Ciaran O'Keeffe 



Q 






to 

B 



P 

orq 

W 
o 

s 



ACTIVITIES 155 



u 

o 
s 
a 

Q 







Dance Club: Mary Speer, Alex Biaz, Stephanie Sherwell, Karen Smith. Lida Baldwin, Alex 
Nader 




GALA: Cindy Young. Amy Caddie. Joe Koskuba. Mary Holmes, George Jamison, Ann Veig 
Andrea Nolan 



156 ACTIVITIES 



The Fall Elm Staff: Cindy Young, Sherry 
Menton, Kris Wallenburg, Karyn lacan- 
gelo, Greg Coss 



The Spring Elm Staff: Kris Wallenburg, 
Martha Kimura, Justin Cann, Pat Atten- 
asio, J. Tarin Towers, Chris Mihavetz, Doug 
Smith, Chris Griep, Chris Vaughn, Julie 
Greene, Adria Nesberg, Charlie Linehan, 
Amanda Burt 



German Club: Jennifer Griffin, Bill Kerr, 
Brendan Norris, Stefanie Winter, Alex 
Nader, Lida Baldwin, Joe Koskuba 




ACTIVITIES 157 



o 




International Relations: Stephanie 
Sherwell. R.J. Eldridge. Steve Dad- 
zie. Alberto Castro, Ciaran 
O'Keeffe. Michelle Beattie. Ste- 
phanie Tennyson, Joe Koskuba, 
Salwa Amer, Andy McKim, Alex 
Nader, Kate Towery, Alex Nasjietti 



The Historical Society: David 
Searles, Greg Giobbe. Jennifer 
Griffin, Kathleen Feeney, Keith 
Morgan. Richard Slriner, Melissa 
.Sirick. Cynthia Slaby, Jenifer Grin- 
die 



Hillel: Ari Kodek, Steve Dadzie, 
Mike Frey, Brian Gimelson, Joe 
Koskuba, Lainie Goldsmith, Keith 
Daniels 



158 ACTIVITIES 



Hands Out: Mary Holmes, Michelle 
Bcallic, Stephanie Tennyson, Tina 
Dayhoff, Rae Brown, Lisa Blume, 
Kristin Coyne, Tarin Towers, Ken 
Pipkin, Keith Morgan, Mike Tar- 
rant, Tara Kidwell, Christine Smith, 
Tiffany Altizer, Melissa Moore- 
head, Susie Wackerbath, Kathy 
Mullan, Kathleen Feeney, Beth 
Clemcntson, Katie Degcntesh, Kris- 
ten Hamilton, Julie Greene, John 
Phoebus, Kelly Burns, Lainie Gold- 
smith, Monica McDowell, Wistic 
Wurts, Jen Ruppert, Andy McKim, 
Joel Brown, Elisa Hale, Renec 
Kuhnel, Amy Draper, Jessi Boone, 
Amy Osborne, Merritt Pridgeon, 
Kate Towery, George Jamison, 
Kevin Marshall, Jennifer Griffin, 
Karen Bianchini, Carmel Earn- 
shaw, Michelle Sheppard, Jenn 
Saunders, Sally McGee 



Phi Sig: Jeff Newell, Jasper Hop- 
per, Mark Brewen, William Bloom, 
Christopher Head, Ron Jayne, Mark 
Renzi, Jeremy Wolk, Matt Ber- 
shan, Andrew Evans, Peter Hagen, 
Nick Hackett, John Grey, Anthony 
Black, Emron Khan, Frank Cree- 
gan, Nick Armentrout, John Bates, 
Mike Mathias, Keith Erickson,Tim 
Calver, Chris Wolf, John Buckey, 
Mike Mucha, Ross Liszars, Scott 
Graham, Joe Ryan, Liam Kennedy, 
Bob Suec 



Psy Chi: Rose Jarboe, Michael Ker- 
chner, Julianne Dolde 



•'*- 



n 



k 



■i<W-l>>' 



I I, 





2^. 



n 



ACTIVITIES 159 




Psychology Club: Lynn Clifford, Stephanie Evans, Rose Jarboe, George Jamison, Mary Holmes, Ciaran 
O'Keeffe 




Sane Freeze: Ann Veiga, David Searles, Keri Nygaard, Tina Dayhoff, Andrea 
Nolan. Erin Elliott, Laura Fiynn, Cheryl Rinehart 



160 ACTIVITIES 




SGA: Max Walton, Skip Gibson. Sonja Wilson, Megan Ward, Than Parker, Whitney Myrus. 
Christine Smith, Michelle Russo, John Phoebus, Lynn Clifford, Lisa Pruett, Kristen Kujawski, 
Stefanie Lee, Andy McKim, Doug Peterson, Emily Daignault, Michelle Bealtie, Troy Peten- 
brink, Mary Holmes, Jennifer Reddish, Mark Renzi, Jason Kraus, Doug Sarno 
SGA Council: John Buckey, Lionel Dyson. Brooke Frank, Jen DelNero, John Kelly, Kevin Kelly, 
Brian Gimelson, Glenn Warner 




C/5 

> 
n 

o 
s 
s 
c 




•a 

5e* 



Spanish Club: Alex Nasjletti, Mike Tyson, Steve Dadzie, Mike Frey, Alberto Castro, Stephanie 
Tennyson. Stephanie Sherwell. R.J. Eldridge. James .-Mvarez. Karla Pozo, Niurka Goenaga 



ACTIVITIES 161 







k»^ 






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P 






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IH 


W" 




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1 


a i» J* 


^ -^ --^ % 



i 



Terra Firma: Dave Riddiford, Mary Holmes. George Jamison, Andrea Nolan, Kris Wallenburg, Aman- 
da Burt. Sally Haynswonh. Stephanie Evans. Ann Veiga. Cindy Young, Michelle Crosier. Miriam 
Jecelin. Susan Alexander. David Searles. Keith Morgan. Don Munson, Ray Herndon, Melissa Moo- 
rehead. Katie Degentesh. Debbie Spence, Tina Dayhoff, Keri Nygaard 




\V.\C Happenings: R.J. Eldridge. Brian Gimelson, Andy \IcKini 



162 ACTIVITIES 



AXQ 




Jessica Aspiazu, Maria Banashak, Sara Boggess, Sharon Davis, Mary DeVries, Cynthia DeWaters, 
Amy Dezseran. Julie Dill, Caroline Dougherty, Jennifer Fellows, Jennifer Gilday, Jennifer Golden, 
Ivette Gormaz, Courtney Grady, Renee Guckert, Jennifer Hannum. Deborah Harner, Patricia Haw- 
thorne, Elizabeth Hocker, Caroline Jensen, Kristine Karns, Theresa Lerch, Kirsten Lucas, Suzanne 
Mazzullo, Laura McClellan, Elizabeth McGee, Sandra McLelland, Amy Osborne. Karen Prendergrast, 
Merritt Pridgeon, Karen Reck, Renee Rhodes, Julia Scheid, Theresa Sganga, Eleanor Shriver, Jennifer 
Sloan, Alexis Vandernat 



AXfi 163 



Aen 



o 

u 



o 
< 

X 



..« 







•t 



* \ 



/ 




Monita Airen, Frances Baldwin, Sarah Bauer, Katrina Beernink, Jennifer Bornfriend. Deborah Boyer, Karen Brady, Elizabeth 
Carone, Samantha Clements, Catherine Cole, Joan Colton, Margaret Doyle, Nora Garcia, Tracy Greenawalt. Kristin Hilgartner, 
Diana Holton, Jennifer Jaeger, Elisabeth Knieriem. Joan Koo, Mary Manning, Julia Merrell. Alexandra Moringiello, Leslie 
Newcomb, Joy Pichot, Kathleen Robbins. Susan Rosasco, Stephanie Sail, Jennifer Sendax, Rachel Spellar, Jennifer Sponseller, 
Karen Stritehoff, Anastasia Vendelis, Margaret Wadsworth 



1 64 A0n 



ZTA 




Jeanine Bilderback, Mary Blenckstone, Kathy Brewster, Carrie Bryant, Kasey Carroll, Rachel Carter, Traci Costello, Teresa 
Cropper, Michelle Crosier, Shannon Cupka, Wendy Debnam, Franci Green, Natalie Guiberson, Christy Harris. Susan 
Himmelheber, Kelly Huber, Miriam Jecelin, Maria Jerardi, Kate Lackey, Dawn Manion, Helen Marshall. Marion Mc- 
Dermaid, Tammie Michener, Kimberly Millender, Marie Mohler, Jennifer Mowll, Kristin Phalen. Elaine Rively. Karen 
Scott, Tammie Silva, Melissa Sirick, Stephany Slaughter, Rebecca Smith, Brenda Stanley, Barbara Stuart. Amy Usilton. 
Lara Usilton, Ruth Vaeth 



ZTA 165 



KA 



X 

< 

Ph 
< 




Brian Basso, Jeffrey Bauman, John Beachley, Christopher Berghaus, Barry Connor, David Dietz. Mark Dietz, Lionel Dyson, 
Brian Gimelson, Jeffrey Grafton, Dennis Kelleher, Joe Koskuba, Jason Kraus, Thomas Leigh, David Littleton, Andrew 
Parks, Troy Petenbrink, Gordon Scherer, Scott Shepherd, Benjamin Smyth, Thad Ulrich, Jarrod Wunderlich 



#A0 




Peter Basel, Lewis Beirne, James Bonsack, William Brimhall, Christian Graham, Edward Greeley, Jesse Hammock, Kyle 
Hutchison, Matthew Johnson, John Kelly, Christopher Kleberg, Carl Knorr, Charles Linehan, Colin Planck, Andrew Prevost. 
Michael Rumsey, Daniel Russell, Christopher Sanchez, John Semmes, Sean Swift, David Taibl. Christopher N'aughn. Justin 
Wiest 




*A0 167 



Q 



Q 



h-5 



AHA 





■ 


/fidSpSlH 




1? 




TIf ■ij.s'^ 



Curtis Campbell, Daniel Cooper. Gregory Giobbe, Janairo Hernandez, Christopher Jones. David Lipinski. John Morrall. Edmund 
Noonan, Jeffrey Rexford, Stuart Warner, Matthew Wolpoc 



168 AHA 




Spencer Beck. William Brandenburg, Brian Ford, John Francomano, Michael Ginns, William Halagarda, Raymond Herndon. 
Peter Jons, Jeffrey Lim, Terence McCabe, John McCarthy. Jonathan Mulvaney, Kristopher Murphy. Thomas Obara. 
Gregory Oliver, Nathaniel Parker, Vincent Sanudo, Jonathan Seal, David Snyder, Wayne Sprouse, Michael Swanson, Darren 
Vican, Keith Whiteford 



ex 169 





170 




XPERIEN 













1991-1992 MEN'S BASKETBALL 



Peter Basel, Charles Cummings, Jerry Davis, Jay Devlin, Dan Dutton, Eric Henry. 
Allen Lester, Tim Liddy, Peter Mugar, Kris Murphy, Adam Poe, Greg Rogers, Jason 
Ronstadt, Geoff Rupert, Mike Swanson, Darren Vican, Head Coach: Tom Finnegan. 
Asst. Coaches: Mike Hart, Steve Johnson. 



Two close road losses to 
Widener and Johns 
Hopkins derailed the 
1991-92 Washington College 
basketball playoff drive in the 
campaign's final week of play, 
but the Shoremen rebounded 
from a slow start to post a 14- 
1 1 season. 

A win in either of the last two 
games would have propelled the 
Shoremen into the MAC play- 
offs for the ninth time in the last 
ten years, but Washington ab- 
.sorbed an 86-79 overtime defeat 
at Widener followed by an 85- 
76 setback in the finale at arch 
rival Hopkins. Washington ral- 
lied from an 11-point first half 
deficit at Hopkins to forge a one- 
point lead at the half, but the 
Blue Jays rode a 10 for 15 three- 
point shooting night to subdue a 
solid Shoremen effort. After a 
missed goaltending call prevent- 
ed the Shoremen from pulling 
within one, Washington re- 
bounded behind 1 1 first half 
points, the final two on free 
throws after the buzzer, to gain 
their only lead of the half, 36- 



Shoremew 



35. 

The win at Swarthmore was 
sweet revenge for the Shoremen, 
who dropped a 78-77 thriller to 
the Garnet a week earlier at 
home. That setback put Wash- 
ington at 1-2 in the league 
standings, but Washington won 
its next six games to set up the 
dramatic final week of play. In- 
cluded in the win skein were two 
wins apiece over league foes 
Haverford and Ursinus. a home 
win over state rival Western 
Maryland, and the monumental 
win at Swarthmore. Washing- 
ton's average winning margin 
during the stretch was over 17 
points per game. 

Washington was the benefi- 



ciary of solid contributions from 
guards Cummings and junior 
Peter Basel. Cummings worked 
his way into a starting guard spot 
in January and scored over 5 
points per contest in 21 games. 
Basel became a force as Wash- 
ington's sixth man. leading the 
club into scoring twice and av- 
eraging nearly ten points per 
outing. .Additional bench 
strength came from freshmen 
guards Adam Poe and Jason 
Ronstadt. who contributed ball 
handling talents and the ability 
to extend opposing defenses with 
the three-point threat. Dow n low, 
junior forwards Mike Swanson 
and Dan Dutton performed ably 
off the bench, combining for five 
points and five rebounds per 
game. 

The winning season was 
Washington's llth in 12 years. 
During that span. Washington 
has made four trips to the 
NC.-XA postseason tournament, 
including a trip to the Final Four 
in 19S9-90. and has won 20 or 
more aames three times. 



SPORTS 173 




NITY 



1991 WOMEN'S 
FIELD HOCKEY 










Jean Ames. Amy Barrell, Jenifer Blenkslone, Cheryl Bull. Alicia Carberry, Brigid DeVries, Renee Guckert. Ashley Hershey. Maria 
Jerardi. Caroline Jensen. Healher Mayr. Amy McCleary. Marie Mohler. Elizabeth Olivere. Kris Phalen. Catherine Rogers. Jennifer 
Ruppert. Karen Scott. Eleanor Shriver. Head Coach: Diane Guinan. Assl. Coaches: Lacy Frazer. Erin O'Neal, 





ashington's seventh Field 
Hockey season produced a 
fifth consecutive winning 
campaign, and a second 
straight 10-win slate, featur- 
ing six wins over Middle Atlantic Conference foes. 
The Shorewomen's 10-5-1 record improved 
Washington's mark during the last five years to 
45-26-2. The "9 1 squad missed the MAC playoffs, 
losing a 4-0 decision to Haverford late in the sea- 
son which dropped their MAC Southeast league 
record to 3-2, Washington finished third in the 
league with wins over Albright, Widener and 
Swarthmore. 

The Shorewomen won several contests decided 



by one goal, two in overtime. Washington opened 
the campaign with a 1-0 overtime conquest over 
state rival Western Maryland. 

After a 4-0 win at Wesley in the season's second 
game, Washington suffered a 2-0 setback at FDU- 
Madison and two defeats at Salisbury State Sun- 
fest Tournament, including a 5-0 loss to the na- 
tionally ranked Gulls. Washington rebounded with 
two consecutive wins over Catholic, before losing 
a 3-0 bout with Elizabethtown. The Shorewoman 
won six of their last eight, highlighted by their 
first ever road win at Johns Hopkins, a 2-0 win. 
Overall, the Shorewomen solidified and produced 
a Washington attack that outshout opponents 291- 
264. 



174 SPORTS 





Shorewomen 
1 
1 





2 
3 

7 
1 

2 
2 
2 
3 
1 



Opponent 

Dickinson 

@ Wesley 

FDU-Madison 2 
U Sunfest Tournament 

Oneonta St. 2 

Salisbury St. 5 

Catholic 1 

Catholic 2 

@ Elizabeth ^ 3 

Albright / 

@ Swarthmore 

Haverford 4 

@ Frostburg St. 1 

@ Johns Hopkins 

Randolph Macon 2 

@ Widener 2 

W. Maryland 



"tx 






ETERM 




■NATION 






he Mouse that 
Roared" is a 
good description 
of the 1991-92 
men's varsity 
swim team. This marks only the sec- 
ond year that the men's team com- 
peted on a varsity level and the first 
time it faced a full line-up of chal- 
lengers. However, the team proved to 
be a worthy opponent and is expected 
to continue to make great strides. 

Although the team finished with a 
losing record for the close of the sea- 
son, eight members of the team qual- 
ified in one or more events at MAC 



Shoremen 



championships.* The team also re- 
wrote all of last year's records and 
did much better during the season 
compared to last year. The team was 
able to beat Salisbury State Univer- 
sity and came within six points of de- 



feating Goucher College, who beat 
the first year team by sixty points at 
last year's meet. 

One of the most obvious reasons 
for this year's accomplishments as the 
arrival of seven very enthusiastic and 
capable freshmen. The new additions 
to the team also sparked the return- 
ing members — who all set personal 
best times during the season. 

*The season was not complete at the 
time of publication and additional 
swimmers were close to qualifying. 




SPORTS 177 



1 



PARKLE 




1991-92 WOMEN'S SWIMMING 

Ramsey Bigham, Kasey Carrol, Joan Colton, Mimi Devlin, Beverly Diaz, Amy Draper, 
Magdelena Fuchs, Jennifer Green, Leslie Newcomb, Karen Prendergast, Eleanor Shriv- 
er, Christina Sturges, Dede Swinden. Nancy Whiteman, Head Coach: Kim Lessard, 
Asst. Coach: Mike Stone. 




Iashington Col- 
lege's women's 
team has fin- 
ished ninth in the MAC 
Championships for three 
consecutive years, and is 
forecast for a similar finish 
this season. Swimmers 
qualify for the conference 
championships by beating 
specific times set for each 
event at any given time 
during the regular season. 
Shorcwomen swimmers 
include iwo-timc All- 
,\merican senior Kasey 
Carroll, senior Leslie New- 
comb, junior Karen Pren- 
dergast. sophomores Mimi 



w 



Devlin. Ramsey Bigham, 
Magdalena Fuchs, Jenni- 
fer Green, and freshmen 
Amy Draper and Dede 
Swinden. These swimmers 
formed the nucleus of a 
Shorcwomen squad that 
posted regular season wins 
over MAC foes Widener, 
Elizabethtown, Western 
Marvland and Lebanon 



Valley, and lost close meet;] 
to Juniata and Swarth 
more. Carroll, who has al 
ready qualified to competi 
in three events at thi 
NCAA Division III Na 
lional Championships a 
the State University of new 
York at Buffalo, has beer 
the driving force behind tht 
Shorcwomen success foi 
four years. She holds eigh 
individual school records 
and has earned All-Amer 
ican honors in the 165C 
freestyle and the 400 IIV 
for two consecutive \ears. 



4-^ 




SPORTS 179 




Birst year Washing- 
ton College soccer 
coach Todd Helb- 
ing took an under- 
manned squad through a chal- 
lenging schedule to post a 1-13- 
1 record in '91. Helbing took 
over a program that had been 
on the decline for several years 
and installed a new feeling of 
confidence and spirit in an at- 
tempt to right the course. 

A nucleus of five seniors and 
three juniors battled its way 
through a schedule that includ- 
ed two nationally-ranked teams, 
two regionally-ranked teams, 
two NCAA Tournament teams, 
and five others that won nine or 
more games this season. Wash- 
ington held the two nationally- 
ranked foes, second-ranked Eli- 
zabethtown and 12th-ranked 
Haverford, to 0-0 standoffs at 
halftime before faltering in the 
final frame. 

Washington did post a 1-1 tie 
against highly regarded Frank- 
lin and Marshall squad that had 
built a formidable lead in the 
series over the past two dec- 
ades. After a scoreless first half, 
Washington booted a penalty 
kick with just over six minutes 
remaining in the game to force 
the deadlock. 

The Shoremen captured their 
lone victory in the season's final 
game, knocking off Delaware 
Valley 3-0. 



SPORTS 



ERSIST 



1991 MEN'S SOCCER 




3 a ^? 3 I 3 5 



. 2i^ i/i JL ua ^- ^ ^ ''. 










Caperton Beirne, Mathew Cairns, Jason Gilbride, Christian Graham, Bill Griffin, Tad 
Hershey, Kyle Hutchinson, Kevin Kelly, Chris Kleberg, Charles Linehan, Greg Miller, 
Gilbrert Orser, Steve Proakis, Jon Seal, John Shannahan, Wayne Sprouse, Head Coach: 
Todd Helbing, Asst. Coach: Carl Helbing. 




ANCE 





Shoremen Opponent 

(© Wesley 3 

1 St. Mary's 4 
Dickinson 5 
@, Salisbury St. 5 

Guilford 3 

1 F & M 1 
Elizabethtown 6 
(s Swarthmore 5 
W. Maryland 2 

Ursinus 3 

Goldey Beacon 3 

@ Widener 4 

Haverford 2 

Johns Hopkins 1 

Delaware Vallev 


















SPORl^ .181 






NERGY 




182 SPORTS 



1991 WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL 




Claudia Baldwin, Beverly Diaz, Julie Dill, Katina Duklewski, Niurka Goenaga, Natalie Guiberson, 
Laura Heidel, Miriam Jecelin, Kirsten Lucas, Sabrina Luginbuhl, Laura McClellan, Meredith 
McPherson, Theresa Scanga. Head Coach: Penny Fall, Asst. Coaches: Leigh Ann Gay, Bret McCrea. 



Sehind a trio of tal- 
ented seniors, Wash- 
ington fashioned a 
22-18 record that in- 
cluded a Chesapeake Invita- 
tional championship and a sec- 
ond-place finish in the Wash- 
ington College Invitational. 

The Shorewomen finished 2- 
3 in the Middle Atlantic Con- 
ference Southwest Section, in- 
cluding wins over Johns Hop- 
kins and Dickinson. Washing- 
ton lost a chance at the MAC 
playoffs by dropping late-sea- 
son league bouts to Western 
Maryland and Franklin and 
Marshall. Washington cap- 
tured MAC crossover contests 
against Widener, Scranton and 




Shorewomen 

Swarthmore to help improve 
upon last season's 14-22 slate. 
The Shorewomen opened the 
campaign by topping Goucher 
and Notre Dame, but then ran 
into trouble in two early tour- 
naments, losing three games at 
the Gettysburg Invitational and 
four at the Salisbury State Gull 
Classic. Washington then ral- 
lied to win three consecutive 



games over Widener, Scranton 
and Gallaudet in its own In- 
vitational, finishing in the tour- 
nament's top three for the first 
time in ten years. Subsequent 
wins over Johns Hopkins and 
Swarthmore, and a third place 
finish in the Gallaudet Invita- 
tional boosted Washington's 
record to 18-13 before a three 
game skid against Western 
Maryland, Wilmington and 
Franklin and Marshall damp- 
ened Washington's postseason 
hopes. The Shorewomen none- 
theless rebounded to win the 
Chesapeake Invitational with 
wins over Goucher. Notre 
Dame. Hood and Marvmount. 



SPORTS 1S3 



Senior Directory 



Absher. Katherine E. 
13 Bel Manor Drive 
Faimionl, WV 26554 

Albers, Jennifer C. 
484 Fairway Drive 
Petersburg. VA 23805 

Ashley. Sydney C. 
Rt. 1. Box 180 
Mill Farm 
Cemreville. MD 21617 

Aspiazu. Jessica L. 
3801 Ferrara Drive 
Silver Spring, MD 20906 

Athey. Julie C. 
Rte. 3, Box 7A1 
Chestertown. MD 21620 

Attenasio. Patrick W. 
256 Pembrook Road 
Mountainside. NJ 07092 

Baldwin. Frances C. 
2 1 3 Woodland Avenue 
Lynchburg. VA 24503 

Banashak. Maria R, 
714 Margo Road 
Baltimore. MD 21222 

Basso. Brian A. 
103 Esperanza Drive 
Lexington Park. MD 
20653 

Bates. John W. 
18 Croftley Road 
Lutherville. MD 21093 

Bauman, Jeffrey R. 
1 1 Valinor Road 
Belle Meade. NJ 08502 

Beacham. Veryan S. 

1121 Los Angeles 

Avenue 

Atlanta. GA 30306 



Beachley. John D. 
89 Oyster Cove 
Grasonville, MD 21638 

Beale. Evelyn. M. 
509 Mulbenry Road 
Maninsville. VA 241 12 

Beane. Adriane A. 
8603 Long Acre Court 
Bethesda, MD 20817 

Seattle. Michelle A. 
4433 DuPont Parkway 
Townsend. DE 19734 

Beemink, Katrina C. 
P.O. Box 533 
Sparks. MD 21152 

Berger. Edward R. 
338 Hunner Road 
Pasadena. MD 21 122 

Black. Anthony W. 
306 Elm Avenue 
Easton. MD 21601 

Blakelock. John W. 
P.O. Box 297 
Princess Anne. MD 
21853 

Blenck.stone, Jenifer A. 

6301 N. Charies St., Apt. 

108 

Baltimore, MD 21212 

Blenckstone. Mary C. 
R.D. 2, Box 764C 
Chestertown. MD 21620 

Blount. James \. 
P.O. Box 5 1 1 
Greenville. NC 27835 

Blume. Lisa R. 
R.D. 2. Box 2436 
Spring Grove. PA 17362 

Bohutinskv. Andrew F.. 



6505 NW Sumac Lane 
Kansas City. MO 64152 

Bonner. Sharon L. 
9720 Hickoryhurst Drive 
Baltimore, MD 21236 

Boucher. Steven E. 
214 E. Chatsworth 
Avenue 
Reisterstown. MD 21 136 

Boyer, Deborah A. 
117 Park Way 
Camillus. NY 13031 

Brady. Karen F. 
9 Brook Lane 
Chalfont, PA 18914 

Brewster, Mary K. 
3005 Ebbtide Drive 
Edgewood. MD 21040 

Bright, David W. 
115 Cedar Street 
Chestertown. MD 21620 

Brightman. David F. 

503 E. Wynnewood 

Road 

Merion Station. PA 

19066 

Bucci, Cynthia J. 
1320 Terry Way 
Fallston. MD 21047 

Buchanan. Lara T. 
4201 Landing Lane 
Dunkirk. MD 20754 

Buckey, John E. 
9 Oak Land 
Richmond, VA 23226 

Butchan. Andrea L. 
7823 Ellenham Avenue 
Ruxton. MD 212(U 



Carroll. Kathleen M. 
6190 Nicole Court 
Longwood Run 
Sarasota, FL 34243 

Carter. Rachel M. 
408 Chesterfield Avenue 
P.O. Box 366 
Cemreville. MD 21617 

Chatfield. Benjamin V.. 
Jr. 

5509 N. 32nd Street 
Arlington, VA 22207 

Clarke, Jennifer A. 
3911 Cloverhill Road 
Baltimore. MD 21218 

Clary. Kristina A. 

P.O. Box 1105 

Mt. Vernon. OH 43050 

Cobum. Kimberly 
3100 Hey Road 
Richmond, VA 23224 

Cole, Catherine E. 
42 Cowdin Lane 
Chappaqua, NY 10514 

Colton, Joan S, 
2627 Ebony Road 
Baltimore. MD 21234 

Conaty. Matthias 
2003 Brandyv^ood Lane 
Wilmington. DE 19810 

Coss. Gregory C. 
5614 Northfield Road 
Bethesda. MD 20817 

Crandall. Mary E. 
57 Black Oak Drive 
Attleboro, MA 02703 

Cupka. Shannon E. 
10 Tyne Court 
Kendall Park. NJ 08824 



Daly. Jeffrey T. 
36 Asbury Drive 
Denton. MD 21629 

De Santis. Justine 
38 Wakefield Lane 
Piscataway. NJ 08854 

Dezseran. Amy E. 
826 Waterford Drive 
Delran. NJ 08075 

Diefenderfer. Edna R. 
P.O. Box 304 
Preston. MD 21655 

Dittmann. Miriam B. 
347 Candle Ridge Coun 
Arnold, MD 21012 

Dolde. Julianne L. 
8 Grier Avenue 
Chesapeake City. MD 
21915 

Dombkowski. Juanita W. 
1 37 N. Lake Drive 
Stevensville. MD 21666 

Doyle. Margaret M. 
10101 Daventry Drive 
Cockeysville. MD 21030 

Driscoll. Elizabeth S. 
16323 Matthews Road 
Monkton. MD 2 1 1 1 1 

Elfenbein. Edward J. 
8806 Churchfield Lane 
Laurel. MD 20708 

Feely. Moira S. 
19 Messenger Lane 
Sands Point. NY 1 1050 

Feeney, Kathleen E. 
309 N. Carolina Avenue 
Pasadena. MD 21122 

Feeney, Pamela S. 
1518 Flvnt Place 



IS4 Senior Directory 



Crol'lon. MD 21 1 14 

Fields-Belanger. Cynihiu 

H. 

112 High Street 

Chestertown, MD 21620 

Francomano, John R., Ill 
8208 Yarborough Road 
Towson. MD 21204 

Frank. Brooke L. 
225 E. Oak Avenue 
Moorestown, NJ 08057 

Gardiner. Richard H. 
1201 Conowingo Road 
Bel Air, MD 21014 

Gessner, Samuel M. 
3216 19th Street. NW 
Washington. DC 20010 

Gimelson. Brian F. 
387 1 Stump Road 
Doylestown. PA 18901 

Golden. Jennifer 
6 Spruce Lane 
Princeton. NJ 08540 

Greenawalt. Tracy L. 
4 Clipping Tree Lane 
Hunt Valley, MD 210.30 

Greene. Julie E. 

117 E. Isabella Street 

Salisbury. MD 21801 

Griep. John C. 
Route I. Box 150-A 
Preston. MD 21655 

Griffin, Jennifer C. 
1 3923 Hanover Road 
Reisterstown. MD 2 1 1 36 

Grindle. Jenifer V. 
P.O. Box 62 
Church Creek. MD 
21622 

Hagen. Peter B. 
10289 Wilde Lake 
Terrace 
Columbia. MD 21044 

Halagarda. William P.. 

Jr. 

220 Terry Boulevard 

Holbrook. NY 11741 

Hamilton. Bruce W. 
Scientists Cliffs 
Port Republic. MD 



20676 

Hamilton. Joseph T. 
946 Foxridge Lane 
Baltimore. MD 21221 

Hanifee. James P. 

181 N. Sassafras Street 

Millington, MD 21651 

Hawthorne. Patricia A. 
8335 Caughdenoy Road 
Clay. NY 1.3041 

Henson. India M. 

8lh IN DIV (Mechl Box 

36 

HHC 3rd Bde 

APO. NY 09028 

Hess, Stephanie J. 
950 Log Cabin Road 
Leola. PA 17540 

Hickman. Gregory L. 

L540 Lower Marlboro 

Road 

Huntington. MD 20639 

Hickman. Tamy B. 
P.O. Box 33 1 
Chestertown. MD 21620 

Hilgartner, Kristin L. 
408 Overbrook Road 
Baltimore. MD 21212 

Hillyard. Sarah F. 
636 St. Paul Street 
Denver, CO 80206 

lacangelo, Karyn A. 
2109 Edgeware Street 
Silver Spring, MD 20905 

Imber, Jason N. 
10 Gracie Square 
New York, NY 10028 

Jaeger. Jennifer L. 
1 1101 Towood Road 
Kingsville, MD 21087 

Jarboe, Rose M. 

9321 Ft. Smallwood 

Road 

Pasadena. MD 21122 

Johnson. Deborah J. 
P.O. Box 381 
Queenstown. MD 21658 

Johnston, Karen M. 
R.D. I, Box 265 

Millinaton, MD 21651 



Kagler. Todd C. 

1016 Middlcborough 

Road 

Baltimore. MD 21221 

Karnes. Patricia J. 
Rl. 1. Box 188 
Marydel. MD 21649 

Kelly. John E. 

27! 1 Elsmore Street 

Fairfax, VA 22031 

Kelly. Kevin P. 

8 Sharonwood Court 

Baltimore. MD 21228 

Kennedy, Robert G., Jr. 
Seminary Avenue 
Manchester, VT 05254 

Kenny, Sabrina C. 
5105 Wasena Avenue 
Baltimore, MD 21225 

Knieriem, Elisabeth E. 
14 Gatespring Court 
Cockeysville, MD 21030 

Koo, Joan 

U.N. Village No. 71. 3rd 

Floor 

Yong San Ku. Hannam. 

Dong 

Seoul. Korea 

Koster. Raphael R. 
L'Hotel Montana-Roga 4 
P.O. Box 523. Rue 
Cardozo 
Port-au-Prince. Haiti 

Kulich. Deborah J. 
Box 279. Wallace Road 
Kinderhook. NY 12106 

Lamanna. Benjamin D. 
5 Barbara Lane 
Camillus. NY 1.3031 

Lease. Cathy J. 

11628 Old Annapolis 

Road 

Frederick. MD 21701 

Lee. Stefanie 

7458 Rosev\ood Manor 

Lane 

Gaithersburg. MD 20879 

Leigh. Thomas H. 
629 Hammond Drive 
Milford. DE 19963 

Lester. .Allen S. 



228 W, Brookhavcn 

Road 

Brookhavcn. PA 19015 

Logan. Thomas R. 
901 Station Avenue 
Langhome. PA 19047 

Luff. James M. 
P.O. Box 453 
Chestertown, MD 21620 

Massicot, Lynn M. 
280 Tollgate Road 
Owings Mills. MD 
2III7 

McBee. Harold A.. Jr. 

1066 Little Magothy 

View 

Annapolis, MD 21401 

McClellan, Laura C. 
1131 Ferber Avenue 
Arnold. MD 2I0I2 

McCrea, Brett A. 
2 Quail Lane 
Georgetown, DE 19947 

McGee, Sarah E. 

6624 Carroll Highlands 

Road 

Sykesville, MD 21784 

McLelland. Sandra J. 
572 Fairthome Avenue 
Philadelphia, PA 19128 

Millender. KimberK A. 
1 120 Main Street 
P.O. Box 154 
Hampstead. MD 21074 

Moffett. Karia M. 
8 Stuart Drive 
Dover. DE 19901 

Moran. Colleen L. 

726 Bamegat Boulevard 

Beachwood. NJ 08722 

Mowll. Jennifer L. 
400 Bayard Avenue 
Rehoboth Beach. DE 
19971 

Nelson. Geoffrev M. 
5125 Baltan Road 
Bethesda. MD 20816 

Neucomb. Leslie W. 
219 Fonepeak Avenue 
Beachwood. NJ 08722 



Newell. Jonathan G. 
226 Cannon Slreel 
Chestertown. MD 21620 

Noble. Roben M,. II 
408 Harvard Boulevard 
West Lawn. PA I96(J9 

Nygaard, Keri A. 
1 1 1 Wicomico Street 
Ocean City, MD 21842 

O'Connor, Patrick J. 
1 2 Three Gables Road 
Morris Township, NJ 
07960 

Orser, Gilbert M. 
377 Green Street 
San Francisco. CA 
94133 

Petenbrink. Troy D. 
Rt. 2. Box 62A 
Oldtown. MD 21555 

Phillips. George G.. Ill 
1101 S. Bay Shore Drive 
Virginia Beach. V.A 
2345 1 

Pinczok. Deeann H. 
3258 Camelot Drive 
Bethlehem, PA 18017 

Post, Vanessa A. 
1041 Madison Street 
Annapolis. MD 21403 

Prevost, .Andrew H. 
1827 .Monroe Street. NW 
Washington. DC 20010 

Pursley. Steven D. 
14306 Dairy dale Road 
Baldwin. MD 2I0I3 

Reck. Karen J. 

31 Fitzhugh .Avenue 

Westminster. .\ID 21 157 

Reed. Kerri A. 
215 Stanmore Road 
Baltimore. MD 21212 

Reese. Barbara .A. 

Box .358. Millmont 

Farms 

Mercersburg. P.A I "236 

Rexford. Jeffrey W. 
I Bruce Lane 
Westport, CT 06880 

Rice, Rachel E, 



Senior Directorx 1S5 



800 St. Andrews Way 

West 

Bel Air. MD 21024 

Riegel. Deidre A. 
S22 Jefferson Street 
Birdsboro. PA 19508 

Robbins. Kathleen M. 
.^0 Skvlark Road 
Greenwich. CT 06830 

Ross. O. Harold 
514 Pondersoa Drive 
Bear. DE 19701 

Russell, Mar>' C. 
21 Idlewhile Avenue 
Betterton. MD 21610 

Sanudo. Vincent J. 
1 1 705 Farside Road 
Ellicott City. MD 21043 

Saunders, Hazel M. 

Chester River Apts. 

#101 

Chestertown. MD 21620 

Schneider. deVismes P. 
Route 2, Box 116 
Trappe, MD 21673 

Scholtz, Heather A. 
45 River Park Drive 
Brick, NJ 08724 

Schram, Julie K. 
733 Deering Road 
Pasadena, MD 21122 



Seal, Jonathan M. 
P.O. Box 380 
Owings Mills, MD 
21117 

Seymour, Christopher C. 
155 Pioneer Drive 
West Hartford, CT 
06117 

Sganga, Theresa L. 
507 White Oak Drive 
Sevema Park, MD 21146 

Sharp, Lawson Y. 
3702 Peace Cliff Road 
Trappe, MD 21673 

Shepherd, Scott A. 
9529 Powderhom Lane 
Baltimore, MD 21234 

Short, Holly S. 
P.O. Box 924 
Chestertown, MD 21620 

Simmons, Donna E. 
Rt. 4, Box 686 
Chestertown, MD 21620 

Simms. Katherine W. 
77 Haytown Road 
Lebanon, NJ 08833 

Skidmore. Heather C. 
302 Litchfield Lane 
Houston, TX 77024 

Skinner, Margaret 
Elizabeth 



2947 Bradenbaugh Road 
White Hall. MD 21161 

Slaby, Cynthia B. 
1497 Crofton Parkway 
Crofton, MD 21114 

Slomkowski, David R. 
12906 N. Point Lane 
Laurel. MD 20708 

Smith, Carey A. 
203 Alexander Drive 
Linwood. NJ 08221 

Smith, Rebecca L. 

8624 Brown Summit 

Road 

Richmond, VA 23235 

Snyder, David F., Jr. 
7434 Rockridge Road 
Baltimore, MD 21208 

Speer, Mary E. 
1212 SW 76th Drive 
Gainesville, PL 32607 

Sponseller, Jennifer K. 

P.O. Box 22 

New Market, MD 21774 

Stritehoff, Karen A. 
1302 Gittings Avenue 
Baltimore, MD 21239 

Summers, Judy C. 
8406 Sunset Drive 
Manassas, V A 22110 



2618 Caroline Street 
Fredericksburg, VA 
22401 

Thuman, Janviere S. 
Rt. 1, Box 149 
Grasonville. MD 21638 

Turner, Michael R. 
143 W. 94th Street 
New York. NY 10025 

Tyson. Michael L. 

1521 Dale Drive 

Silver Spring. MD 20910 

Ulrich, Thad C. 
Rt. 1. Box 316 
Ocean View, DE 19970 

Undercoffler. Amy L. 
1 105 Lake Wood Trail 
Collierville, TN 38017 

Usilton, Amy L. 
Rt. I, Box 256 
Worton, MD 21678 

Vendelis. Anastasia E. 
2200 Pot Spring Road 
Timonium. MD 21093 

Wallenburg. Kristin E. 
Washington College 
Chestertown. MD 21620 

Warner, Glenn M. 
4021 Dre.xel Drive 
Vestal, NY 13850 



135 Alderwood Lane 
Rochester. NY 14615 

Wildman. Franklin G. 

1561 Yellow Springs 

Road 

Malvern. PA 19355 

Wilen, Monica E. 
AGA DeMexico S.A. 
AP 376 CP54000 
Tlanepantla 
EDO De Mexico 
Mexico 379-1198 

Woelper. Cornelia L. 
100 Linwood Avenue 
Bel Air. .MD 21014 

Woodrum, Anne H. 
2641 Comwallis Avenue 
Roanoke. VA 24014 

Yon, Michelle R. 

307 Washington Avenue 

Chestertown. MD 21620 

Zeiiler. Ariene B. 
P.O. Box 94 
Middletown. DE 19709 



Tennyson, Stephanie L. Wiater, Susan L. 



CO 



Editors-in-Chief 


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Heather A. Scholtz 


n:> 


Susan A. Czechowski 


Sports 

Troy Petenbrink 


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Photography 

P.J. MuUin 


m 


Jim Jenkins 
Greg Hickman 


o 


Staff 

Marcie Duffy 

Jen Hozik 
Sue Huntley 


> 





CO 




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What we did 

All we can say about this book is 
••WE DID IT!!" We don't know how 
and we don't know why, but remark- 
ably enough, here it is ... The 1992 
Pegasus. Sue had the artistic flair. 
Heather knew how to type. Neither of 
us had any experience, and although 
we realize that this means nothing to 
anyone but our staff, we published a 
yearbook without that stupid speaker 
in our staff photo! Needless to say, we, 
as do all editors, have a cast of 
thousands to thank. 

To the 1992 staff — your dependabi- 
lity and constant dedication have been 
highly appreciated. 

JP — Sorry we never got your hat. 
And how much were your bills this 
month?? OK, we'll pay you. 
Troy and Greg — You've seen all the 
rest, you helped us 
make the best. 
Thanks for all your 
help and encourage- 
ment. We couldn't 
have done this with- 
out you. 

Jen and Marcie — 
Our two little elves, 
who spent endless 
hours folding, lick- 
ing, stuffing and 
copying. 

Jim — OK, so you 
took 9,000 rolls of 
the Casey Academic 
Center and we didn't 
use one, but don't 
get discouraged; we 
wouldn't have the 
first sixteen pages if 
it weren't for you. 

Gary Brown — We owe you our lives. 
Thank you for believing that we would 
return your photos. 

Diane Larrimore — Without you, this 
book would have been nameless. 
Doug — Thank you for the encour- 
agement and being patient. 
And to the people in the mailroom and 
business office — thank you for hav- 
ing so mu '^ patience with us. 

Heather 

As a graduati:"-' senior, I have the 
fortunate privilege of using this page 
to thank and bid .< fond farewell to 



Who helped 

some very special people. 
To my professors, Drs. Creegan, 
Locker and Roat — you have each in- 
spired and encouraged me in one form 
or another. Your efforts will not be 
forgotten. 

To my Dad — you've gotten me 
through these past four years both fi- 
nancially and emotionally. For this I 
can only offer you my love and grat- 
itude — I don't have any money. 
To my Mom — I dedicate my work 
on this book to you. I think you'd be 
proud. 

A special thanks to all of the people 
who have made my life worthwhile: 
Toon, Susie, Dawn, Jennifer, Eliza- 
beth, my family, Ville, 
And especially Joe — you've been my 





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sole inspiration for the past two years. 
You've taught me to hold onto my 
dreams even when something else gets 
in the way, and that no matter how 
many dreams you have, there's always 
room for one more. I love you. Pump- 
kin! 

AND FINALLY, 

To Susie — No more missed dead- 
lines, no more dorm pictures, no more 
turkeys on platters ... not for me an- 
yway! I suspect, however, that I will 
still be getting those late night phone 
calls next year — ••What font does 
body copy go in??" I wish you the 



And thank you 

best of luck next year as editor, and 
don't worry, I'll be there for you ■ 
just as you have been for me. You and 
I are not only co-editors and room- 
mates, we're friends. All I can say 
about this year is you learn a lot about 
a person when you share a bathroom 
with her! Good times with you will be 
missed. 

Love, 
Heather 

Sue 

Hopefully, this product of so many 
wonderful people will bring memories 
back for years to come. 
I know that for myself 
making this book cre- 
ated memories and 
friendships I will cher- 
ish forever. 

The one person I 
want to thank more than 
anyone is Heather. Both 
of us started out clue- 
less to how to make a 
yearbook, but through it 
all, no matter in Provi- 
dence, Harvard, Pak 
Place, or Maryland, we 
did it singing "Satur- 
day Night Fever" and 
"I Touch Myself." 
Now that our yearbook- 
ing adventure comes to 
an end, I don't know 
how I will do this again next year 
without you. Who will I lock out of 
bathrooms, make crazy phone messa- 
ges with, and type "hot" copy. You 
are irreplaceable as my Co-Editor, 
bathroom buddy, and Friend. Heather, 
I will miss you dearly, and I promise 
never to wash our office walls. So, do 
we want the purple velvet or orange 
day glo cover? 

Love, 
Susie 



9